Floppy vs Velvet - What's the difference?

floppy | velvet |


As adjectives the difference between floppy and velvet

is that floppy is limp, not hard, firm, or rigid; flexible while velvet is made of velvet.

As nouns the difference between floppy and velvet

is that floppy is (computing) a floppy disk while velvet is a closely woven fabric (originally of silk, now also of cotton or man-made fibres) with a thick short pile on one side.

As a verb velvet is

(cooking) to coat raw meat in starch, then in oil, preparatory to frying.

floppy

English

Adjective

(er)
  • Limp, not hard, firm, or rigid; flexible.
  • * 2005 , , Bloomsbury Publishing, p. 3,
  • The smile, the white collar worn with a dark shirt, the floppy breast-pocket handkerchief would surely be famous when the chaps in the rows behind were mere forgotten grins and frowns.

    Derived terms

    * floppy disk, floppy disc

    Noun

    (floppies)
  • (computing) A floppy disk
  • Synonyms

    * diskette

    Derived terms

    * mini-floppy * micro-floppy

    velvet

    English

    (wikipedia velvet)

    Noun

  • A closely woven fabric (originally of silk, now also of cotton or man-made fibres) with a thick short pile on one side.
  • * , title=The Mirror and the Lamp
  • , chapter=2 citation , passage=She was a fat, round little woman, richly apparelled in velvet and lace, […]; and the way she laughed, cackling like a hen, the way she talked to the waiters and the maid, […]—all these unexpected phenomena impelled one to hysterical mirth, and made one class her with such immortally ludicrous types as Ally Sloper, the Widow Twankey, or Miss Moucher.}}
  • Very fine fur, including the skin and fur on a deer's antlers.
  • (rare ): A female chinchilla; a sow.
  • Derived terms

    * black velvet * Velvet Revolution * velvety (adjective)

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (cooking) To coat raw meat in starch, then in oil, preparatory to frying
  • Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • Made of velvet.
  • Soft and delicate, like velvet; velvety.
  • * Milton
  • The cowslip's velvet head.
  • (label) peaceful, carried out without violence; especially as pertaining to the peaceful breakup of Czechoslovakia.
  • * 1995 , Amin Saikal, William Maley, Russia in Search of Its Future , page 214
  • What at the time of the initial agreement of Yeltsin, Shushkevich and Kravchuk to join together in a new 'Commonwealth of Independent States' had seemed like a reconstitution of the lands of ancient Rus, quickly turned out to be, in the words of the leading Russian-Ukrainian reformer Aleksandr Tsipko, merely a 'velvet disintegration'.
  • * 2006 , The Analyst: Central and Eastern European Review
  • The disintegration always took place within internal borders, whether it was velvet , as in the case of the Czech Republic and Slovakia, or bloody, like Yugoslavia&
  • 39;s still unfinished break-up.
  • * 2011 , David Gillies, Elections in Dangerous Places: Democracy and the Paradoxes of Peacebuilding , page 248:
  • If the Sudanese can resolve the final steps in a velvet divorce and move in a more democratic direction, that will serve as a heartening "ideal model of change"
  • * 2011 , Javad Etaat quoted in Hooman Majd, The Ayatollahs' Democracy: An Iranian Challenge , page 39:
  • “I was once invited to give a speech about the attempt to topple Iran's political system through a ‘velvet' revolution,’ ” says Etaat in the debate, “but we all know that ‘' velvet revolutions’ always occur in dictatorships.”
  • * 2014 , Dana H. Allin, NATO's Balkan Interventions , page 97
  • There is such a thing as a velvet divorce: if Canada or Belgium were to split apart, the consequences would be unfortunate but manageable.