Taunts vs Vaunts - What's the difference?

taunts | vaunts |


As verbs the difference between taunts and vaunts

is that taunts is (taunt) while vaunts is (vaunt).

As nouns the difference between taunts and vaunts

is that taunts is while vaunts is .

taunts

English

Verb

(head)
  • (taunt)
  • Noun

    (head)

  • taunt

    English

    Etymology 1

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • to make fun of (someone); to (a person) into responding, often in an aggressive manner.
  • Noun

    (en noun)
  • A scornful or mocking remark; a jeer or mockery
  • Etymology 2

    Compare (etyl) . See ataunt.

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • (nautical) Very high or tall.
  • a ship with taunt masts
    (Totten)

    vaunts

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (vaunt)
  • Noun

    (head)

  • vaunt

    English

    Etymology 1

    (etyl) vaunter, variant of (etyl) vanter, from (etyl) .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To speak boastfully.
  • * 1829 — , chapter XC
  • "The number," said he, "is great, but what can be expected from mere citizen soldiers? They vaunt and menace in time of safety; none are so arrogant when the enemy is at a distance; but when the din of war thunders at the gates they hide themselves in terror."
  • To speak boastfully about.
  • To boast of; to make a vain display of; to display with ostentation.
  • * Bible, 1 Cor. xiii. 4
  • Charity vaunteth not itself, is not puffed up.
  • * Milton
  • My vanquisher, spoiled of his vaunted spoil.
    Synonyms
    * (speak boastfully) boast, brag
    Derived terms
    * vaunter

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A boast; an instance of vaunting.
  • * Milton
  • the spirits beneath, whom I seduced / with other promises and other vaunts
  • * 1904 — , Book II, chapter III
  • He has answered me back, vaunt' for ' vaunt , rhetoric for rhetoric.

    Etymology 2

    (etyl) . See avant, vanguard.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) The first part.
  • (Shakespeare)
    (Webster 1913)

    Anagrams

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