Vault vs Vaunt - What's the difference?

vault | vaunt |


In lang=en terms the difference between vault and vaunt

is that vault is to build as, or cover with a vault while vaunt is to boast of; to make a vain display of; to display with ostentation.

As nouns the difference between vault and vaunt

is that vault is an arched structure of masonry, forming a ceiling or canopy or vault can be an act of vaulting; a leap or jump while vaunt is a boast; an instance of vaunting or vaunt can be (obsolete) the first part.

As verbs the difference between vault and vaunt

is that vault is to build as, or cover with a vault or vault can be (ambitransitive) to jump or leap over while vaunt is to speak boastfully.

vault

English

(wikipedia vault)

Etymology 1

From (etyl) volte (modern .

Noun

(en noun)
  • An arched structure of masonry, forming a ceiling or canopy.
  • * Gray
  • the long-drawn aisle and fretted vault
  • A structure resembling a vault, especially (poetic) that formed by the sky.
  • * Shakespeare
  • that heaven's vault should crack
  • * 1985', God said, ‘Let there be a ' vault through the middle of the waters to divide the waters in two.’ — Genesis 1:6 (New Jerusalem Bible)
  • A secure, enclosed area, especially an underground room used for burial, or to store valuables, wine etc.
  • The bank kept their money safe in a large vault .
    Family members had been buried in the vault for centuries.
  • * Sandys
  • the silent vaults of death
  • * Jonathan Swift
  • to banish rats that haunt our vault
    Derived terms
    * barrel vault * cloister vault * compound vault * cross vault * decapartite vault * dodecapartite vault * domical vault * groin vault * oblique vault * octopartite vault * panel vault * polygonal vault * quadripartite vault * quinquepartite vault * ribbed vault * segmental vault * septempartite vault * sexpartite vault * star vault * stilted vault * tripartite vault * Welsh vault

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To build as, or cover with a vault.
  • * Sir Walter Scott
  • The shady arch that vaulted the broad green alley.

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) frequentative form of (etyl) volvere; later assimilated to Etymology 1, above.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (ambitransitive) To jump or leap over.
  • The fugitive vaulted over the fence to escape.
    Derived terms
    * vaulter * vaulting

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • An act of vaulting; a leap or jump.
  • (gymnastics) An event in gymanstics performed on a vaulting horse.
  • See also

    * pole vault * vaulting horse

    vaunt

    English

    Etymology 1

    (etyl) vaunter, variant of (etyl) vanter, from (etyl) .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To speak boastfully.
  • * 1829 — , chapter XC
  • "The number," said he, "is great, but what can be expected from mere citizen soldiers? They vaunt and menace in time of safety; none are so arrogant when the enemy is at a distance; but when the din of war thunders at the gates they hide themselves in terror."
  • To speak boastfully about.
  • To boast of; to make a vain display of; to display with ostentation.
  • * Bible, 1 Cor. xiii. 4
  • Charity vaunteth not itself, is not puffed up.
  • * Milton
  • My vanquisher, spoiled of his vaunted spoil.
    Synonyms
    * (speak boastfully) boast, brag
    Derived terms
    * vaunter

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A boast; an instance of vaunting.
  • * Milton
  • the spirits beneath, whom I seduced / with other promises and other vaunts
  • * 1904 — , Book II, chapter III
  • He has answered me back, vaunt' for ' vaunt , rhetoric for rhetoric.

    Etymology 2

    (etyl) . See avant, vanguard.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) The first part.
  • (Shakespeare)
    (Webster 1913)

    Anagrams

    *