Waster vs Vaster - What's the difference?

waster | vaster |


As a noun waster

is someone or something that wastes; someone who squanders or spends extravagantly or waster can be (obsolete|chiefly|fencing) a kind of cudgel; also, a blunt-edged sword used as a foil.

As an adjective vaster is

(vast).

waster

English

Etymology 1

Partly from (etyl) wastere, wastour, partly from .

Noun

(en noun)
  • Someone or something that wastes; someone who squanders or spends extravagantly.
  • (dialectal) An imperfection in the wick of a candle, causing it to waste.
  • Synonyms
    * See also
    Derived terms
    * time-waster

    Etymology 2

    Origin unknown.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete, chiefly, fencing) A kind of cudgel; also, a blunt-edged sword used as a foil.
  • *, II.3.6:
  • Or, as they that play at wasters exercise themselves by a few cudgels how to avoid an enemy's blows, let us arm ourselves against all such violent incursions which may invade our minds.

    Anagrams

    * English agent nouns ----

    vaster

    English

    Adjective

    (head)
  • (vast)
  • Anagrams

    * ----

    vast

    English

    Adjective

    (en-adj)
  • Very large or wide (literally or figuratively).
  • The Sahara desert is vast .
    There is a vast difference between them.
  • Very great in size, amount, degree, intensity, or especially extent.
  • * {{quote-magazine, year=2012, month=March-April
  • , author=Anna Lena Phillips , title=Sneaky Silk Moths , volume=100, issue=2, page=172 , magazine=(American Scientist) citation , passage=Last spring, the periodical cicadas emerged across eastern North America. Their vast numbers and short above-ground life spans inspired awe and irritation in humans—and made for good meals for birds and small mammals.}}
  • (obsolete) Waste; desert; desolate; lonely.
  • * William Shakespeare, the Life and Death of Richard the Third Act I, scene IV:
  • the empty, vast , and wandering air

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (poetic) A vast space.
  • * 1608': they have seemed to be together, though absent, shook hands, as over a '''vast , and embraced, as it were, from the ends of opposed winds. — William Shakespeare, ''The Winter's Tale , I.i
  • Derived terms

    * vastly * vastness * ultravast

    Statistics

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