Value vs Worthy - What's the difference?

value | worthy |


As nouns the difference between value and worthy

is that value is the quality (positive or negative) that renders something desirable or valuable while worthy is a distinguished or eminent person.

As verbs the difference between value and worthy

is that value is to estimate the value of; judge the worth of something while worthy is to render or treat as worthy; exalt; revere; honour; esteem; respect; value; reward; adore.

As a adjective worthy is

having worth, merit or value.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

value

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • The quality (positive or negative) that renders something desirable or valuable.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2012, date=May 13, author=Alistair Magowan, work=BBC Sport
  • , title= Sunderland 0-1 Man Utd , passage=United were value for their win and Rooney could have had a hat-trick before half-time, with Paul Scholes also striking the post in the second half.}}
  • The degree of importance given to something.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-07, author=(Gary Younge)
  • , volume=188, issue=26, page=18, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= Hypocrisy lies at heart of Manning prosecution , passage=WikiLeaks did not cause these uprisings but it certainly informed them. The dispatches revealed details of corruption and kleptocracy that many Tunisians suspected, […]. They also exposed the blatant discrepancy between the west's professed values and actual foreign policies.}}
  • The amount (of money or goods or services) that is considered to be a fair equivalent for something else.
  • * M'Culloch
  • An article may be possessed of the highest degree of utility, or power to minister to our wants and enjoyments, and may be universally made use of, without possessing exchangeable value .
  • * Dryden
  • His design was not to pay him the value of his pictures, because they were above any price.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-08-03, volume=408, issue=8847, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Boundary problems , passage=Economics is a messy discipline: too fluid to be a science, too rigorous to be an art. Perhaps it is fitting that economists’ most-used metric, gross domestic product (GDP), is a tangle too. GDP measures the total value of output in an economic territory. Its apparent simplicity explains why it is scrutinised down to tenths of a percentage point every month.}}
  • (music) The relative duration of a musical note.
  • (arts) The relative darkness or lightness of a color in (a specific area of) a painting etc.
  • * Joe Hing Lowe
  • I establish the colors and principal values by organizing the painting into three values--dark, mediumand light.
  • Numerical quantity measured or assigned or computed.
  • Precise meaning; import.
  • the value''' of a word; the '''value of a legal instrument
    (Mitford)
  • (obsolete) Esteem; regard.
  • (Dryden)
  • * Bishop Burnet
  • My relation to the person was so near, and my value for him so great.
  • (obsolete) valour; also spelled valew
  • (Spenser)

    Synonyms

    * (quality that renders something desirable) worth

    Derived terms

    * valuable * valueless * valueness * economic value * face value * note value * par value * time value

    Verb

    (valu)
  • To estimate the value of; judge the worth of something.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-08-03, volume=408, issue=8847, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Boundary problems , passage=Economics is a messy discipline: too fluid to be a science, too rigorous to be an art. Perhaps it is fitting that economists’ most-used metric, gross domestic product (GDP), is a tangle too.
  • To fix or determine the value of; assign a value to, as of jewelry or art work.
  • To regard highly; think much of; place importance upon.
  • To hold dear.
  • Synonyms

    * appreciate * assess * esteem * prise, prize * rate * respect * treasure * valuate * worthen

    Antonyms

    * disesteem * disrespect

    See also

    * value system

    Statistics

    *

    Anagrams

    * ----

    worthy

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) worthy, wurthi, from (etyl) *.

    Adjective

    (er)
  • having worth, merit or value
  • * Shakespeare
  • These banished men that I have kept withal / Are men endued with worthy qualities.
  • * Sir J. Davies
  • This worthy' mind should ' worthy things embrace.
  • honourable or admirable
  • deserving, or having sufficient worth
  • Suited; befitting.
  • * Shakespeare
  • No, Warwick, thou art worthy of the sway.
  • * Bible, Matthew iii. 11
  • whose shoes I am not worthy to bear.
  • * Milton
  • And thou art worthy that thou shouldst not know / More happiness.
  • * Dryden
  • The lodging is well worthy of the guest.
    Derived terms
    * worthily * worthiness

    Noun

    (worthies)
  • a distinguished or eminent person
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl) worthien, wurthien, from (etyl) .

    Verb

  • To render or treat as worthy; exalt; revere; honour; esteem; respect; value; reward; adore.
  • And put upon him such a deal of man, That worthied him, got praises of the king [...]'' — Shakespeare, ''King Lear .
  • * 1880 , Sir Norman Lockyer, Nature :
  • After having duly paid his addresses to it, he generally spends some time on the marble slab in front of the looking-glass, but without showing the slightest emotion at the sight of his own reflection, or worthying it with a song.
  • * 1908 , Edward Arthur Brayley Hodgetts, The court of Russia in the nineteenth century :
  • And it is a poor daub besides," the Emperor rejoined scornfully, as he stalked out of the gallery without worthying the artist with a look.
  • * 1910 , Charles William Eliot, The Harvard classics: Beowulf :
  • No henchman he worthied by weapons, if witness his features, his peerless presence!
    Derived terms
    * (l) * (l) ----