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Force vs Value - What's the difference?

force | value | Synonyms |

Force is a synonym of value.


As a noun force

is force.

As a verb value is

.

force

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) force, fors, forse, from (etyl) .

Noun

(wikipedia force)
  • Strength or energy of body or mind; active power; vigour; might; capacity of exercising an influence or producing an effect.
  • :
  • * (1800-1859)
  • *:He was, in the full force of the words, a good man.
  • Power exerted against will or consent; compulsory power; violence; coercion.
  • *(William Shakespeare), Henry VI, part II
  • *:which now they hold by force , and not by right
  • (lb) Anything that is able to make a big change in a person or thing.
  • A physical quantity that denotes ability to push, pull, twist or accelerate a body which is measured in a unit dimensioned in mass × distance/time² (ML/T²): SI: newton (N); CGS: dyne (dyn)
  • Something or anything that has the power to produce an effect upon something else.
  • *{{quote-magazine, date=2012-03, author=(Henry Petroski), volume=100, issue=2, page=112-3
  • , magazine=(American Scientist) , title= Opening Doors , passage=A doorknob of whatever roundish shape is effectively a continuum of levers, with the axis of the latching mechanism—known as the spindle—being the fulcrum about which the turning takes place. Applying a force tangential to the knob is essentially equivalent to applying one perpendicular to a radial line defining the lever.}}
  • (lb) A group that aims to attack, control, or constrain.
  • :
  • *(William Shakespeare), (Cymbeline)
  • *:Is Lucius general of the forces ?
  • *
  • *:"A fine man, that Dunwody, yonder," commented the young captain, as they parted, and as he turned to his prisoner. "We'll see him on in Washington some day. He is strengthening his forces now against Mr. Benton out there.."
  • *{{quote-news, year=2004, date=April 15, work=The Scotsman
  • , title= Morning swoop in hunt for Jodi's killer , passage=For Lothian and Borders Police, the early-morning raid had come at the end one of biggest investigations carried out by the force , which had originally presented a dossier of evidence on the murder of Jodi Jones to the Edinburgh procurator-fiscal, William Gallagher, on 25 November last year.}}
  • (lb) The ability to attack, control, or constrain.
  • :
  • (lb) A magic trick in which the outcome is known to the magician beforehand, especially one involving the apparent free choice of a card by another person.
  • (lb) Legal validity.
  • :
  • (lb) Either unlawful violence, as in a "forced entry ", or lawful compulsion.
  • Usage notes
    * Adjectives often applied to "force": military, cultural, economic, gravitational, electric, magnetic, strong, weak, positive, negative, attractive, repulsive, good, evil, dark, physical, muscular, spiritual, intellectual, mental, emotional, rotational, tremendous, huge.
    Derived terms
    (Terms derived from "force") * air force * antiforce * brute force * centripetal force * centrifugal force * Coulomb force * Coriolis force * come into force * force field * force multiplier * force to be reckoned with * fundamental force * police force * spent force * task force * workforce

    Verb

    (forc)
  • (lb) To violate (a woman); to rape.
  • *:
  • *:For yf ye were suche fyfty as ye be / ye were not able to make resystence ageynst this deuyl / here lyeth a duchesse deede the whiche was the fayrest of alle the world wyf to syre Howel / duc of Bretayne / he hath murthred her in forcynge her / and has slytte her vnto the nauyl
  • *, II.1:
  • *:a young woman not farre from mee had headlong cast her selfe out of a high window, with intent to kill herselfe, only to avoid the ravishment of a rascally-base souldier that lay in her house, who offered to force her.
  • *, Bk.XVIII, Ch.xxi:
  • *:And I pray you for my sake to force yourselff there, that men may speke you worshyp.
  • (lb) To compel (someone or something) (to) do something.
  • *
  • *:Captain Edward Carlisle; he could not tell what this prisoner might do. He cursed the fate which had assigned such a duty, cursed especially that fate which forced a gallant soldier to meet so superb a woman as this under handicap so hard.
  • *2011 , Tim Webb & Fiona Harvey, The Guardian , 23 March:
  • *:Housebuilders had warned that the higher costs involved would have forced them to build fewer homes and priced many homebuyers out of the market.
  • (lb) To constrain by force; to overcome the limitations or resistance of.
  • *, I.40:
  • *:Shall wee force the general law of nature, which in all living creatures under heaven is seene to tremble at paine?
  • (lb) To drive (something) by force, to propel (generally + prepositional phrase or adverb).
  • *(John Dryden) (1631-1700)
  • *:It stuck so fast, so deeply buried lay / That scarce the victor forced the steel away.
  • *(William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • *:to force the tyrant from his seat by war
  • *(John Webster) (c.1580-c.1634)
  • *:Ethelbert ordered that none should be forced into religion.
  • *2007 , (The Guardian) , 4 November:
  • *:In a groundbreaking move, the Pentagon is compensating servicemen seriously hurt when an American tank convoy forced them off the road.
  • (lb) To cause to occur (despite inertia, resistance etc.); to produce through force.
  • :
  • *2009 , "All things to Althingi", (The Economist) , 23 July:
  • *:The second problem is the economy, the shocking state of which has forced the decision to apply to the EU.
  • (lb) To forcibly open (a door, lock etc.).
  • :
  • To obtain or win by strength; to take by violence or struggle; specifically, to capture by assault; to storm, as a fortress.
  • To create an out by touching a base in advance of a runner who has no base to return to while in possession of a ball which has already touched the ground.
  • :
  • (lb) To compel (an adversary or partner) to trump a trick by leading a suit that he/she does not hold.
  • (lb) To put in force; to cause to be executed; to make binding; to enforce.
  • *(John Webster) (c.1580-c.1634)
  • *:What can the church force more?
  • (lb) To provide with forces; to reinforce; to strengthen by soldiers; to man; to garrison.
  • :(Shakespeare)
  • (lb) To allow the force of; to value; to care for.
  • *(William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • *:For me, I force not argument a straw.
  • Derived terms
    * enforce * forceful * forcible

    See also

    * Imperial unit: foot pound * metric unit: newton * coerce: To control by force.

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (countable, Northern England) A waterfall or cascade.
  • * T. Gray
  • to see the falls or force of the river Kent

    Etymology 3

    See .

    Verb

    (forc)
  • To stuff; to lard; to farce.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Wit larded with malice, and malice forced with wit.

    Statistics

    *

    value

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The quality (positive or negative) that renders something desirable or valuable.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2012, date=May 13, author=Alistair Magowan, work=BBC Sport
  • , title= Sunderland 0-1 Man Utd , passage=United were value for their win and Rooney could have had a hat-trick before half-time, with Paul Scholes also striking the post in the second half.}}
  • The degree of importance given to something.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-07, author=(Gary Younge)
  • , volume=188, issue=26, page=18, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= Hypocrisy lies at heart of Manning prosecution , passage=WikiLeaks did not cause these uprisings but it certainly informed them. The dispatches revealed details of corruption and kleptocracy that many Tunisians suspected, […]. They also exposed the blatant discrepancy between the west's professed values and actual foreign policies.}}
  • The amount (of money or goods or services) that is considered to be a fair equivalent for something else.
  • * M'Culloch
  • An article may be possessed of the highest degree of utility, or power to minister to our wants and enjoyments, and may be universally made use of, without possessing exchangeable value .
  • * Dryden
  • His design was not to pay him the value of his pictures, because they were above any price.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-08-03, volume=408, issue=8847, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Boundary problems , passage=Economics is a messy discipline: too fluid to be a science, too rigorous to be an art. Perhaps it is fitting that economists’ most-used metric, gross domestic product (GDP), is a tangle too. GDP measures the total value of output in an economic territory. Its apparent simplicity explains why it is scrutinised down to tenths of a percentage point every month.}}
  • (music) The relative duration of a musical note.
  • (arts) The relative darkness or lightness of a color in (a specific area of) a painting etc.
  • * Joe Hing Lowe
  • I establish the colors and principal values by organizing the painting into three values--dark, mediumand light.
  • Numerical quantity measured or assigned or computed.
  • Precise meaning; import.
  • the value''' of a word; the '''value of a legal instrument
    (Mitford)
  • (obsolete) Esteem; regard.
  • (Dryden)
  • * Bishop Burnet
  • My relation to the person was so near, and my value for him so great.
  • (obsolete) valour; also spelled valew
  • (Spenser)

    Synonyms

    * (quality that renders something desirable) worth

    Derived terms

    * valuable * valueless * valueness * economic value * face value * note value * par value * time value

    Verb

    (valu)
  • To estimate the value of; judge the worth of something.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-08-03, volume=408, issue=8847, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Boundary problems , passage=Economics is a messy discipline: too fluid to be a science, too rigorous to be an art. Perhaps it is fitting that economists’ most-used metric, gross domestic product (GDP), is a tangle too.
  • To fix or determine the value of; assign a value to, as of jewelry or art work.
  • To regard highly; think much of; place importance upon.
  • To hold dear.
  • Synonyms

    * appreciate * assess * esteem * prise, prize * rate * respect * treasure * valuate * worthen

    Antonyms

    * disesteem * disrespect

    See also

    * value system

    Statistics

    *

    Anagrams

    * ----