Proven vs Valid - What's the difference?

proven | valid |


As a verb proven

is .

As an adjective valid is

valid.

proven

English

Adjective

(en adjective)
  • Having been proved; having proved its value or truth.
  • It's a proven fact that morphine is a more effective painkiller than acetaminophen is.
    Mass lexical comparison is not a proven method for demonstrating relationships between languages.

    Antonyms

    * (having been proved) unproven

    Verb

    (head)
  • Usage notes

    As the past participle of prove, proven is often discouraged, with proved preferred – “have proved” rather than “have proven”. However, today in everyday use they are both used, about equally. Historically, proved'' is the older form, while proven''' arose as a Scottish variant – see . Used in legal writing from mid 17th century, it entered literary usage more slowly, only becoming significant in the 19th century, with the poet among the earliest frequent users (presumably for reasons of meter). In the 19th century, '''proven was widely discouraged, and remained significantly less common through the mid 20th century (''proved being used approximately four times as often), by the late 20th century it came to be used about equally. As an attributive adjective, proven is much more commonly used, and proved is widely considered an error – “a proven method”, not *“a proved method”.

    valid

    English

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • Well grounded or justifiable, pertinent.
  • *{{quote-magazine, year=2012, month=March-April
  • , author=(Jan Sapp) , title=Race Finished , volume=100, issue=2, page=164 , magazine=(American Scientist) citation , passage=Few concepts are as emotionally charged as that of race. The word conjures up a mixture of associations—culture, ethnicity, genetics, subjugation, exclusion and persecution. But is the tragic history of efforts to define groups of people by race really a matter of the misuse of science, the abuse of a valid biological concept?}}
    I will believe him as soon as he offers a valid answer.
  • Acceptable, proper or correct.
  • A valid format for the date is MM/DD/YY.
    Do not drive without a valid license.
  • Related to the current topic, or presented within context, relevant.
  • (logic) Of a formula or system: such that it evaluates to true regardless of the input values.
  • (logic) Of an argument: whose conclusion is always true whenever its premises are true.
  • An argument is valid if and only if the set consisting of both (1) all of its premises and (2) the contradictory of its conclusion is inconsistent.

    Antonyms

    * invalid

    Hyponyms

    * sound