Valetudinarian vs Valetudinarianism - What's the difference?

valetudinarian | valetudinarianism |


As nouns the difference between valetudinarian and valetudinarianism

is that valetudinarian is a person in poor health or sickly, especially one who is constantly obsessed with their state of health while valetudinarianism is the condition of a valetudinarian; a state of feeble health; infirmity.

As an adjective valetudinarian

is sickly, infirm, of ailing health.

valetudinarian

English

Adjective

(en adjective)
  • sickly, infirm, of ailing health
  • The valetudinarian habit of discussing his health had grown on Rose... -- Florence Anne Sellar MacCunn, Sir Walter Scott's Friends, 1910, p. 234
  • * Macaulay
  • The virtue which the world wants is a healthful virtue, not a valetudinarian virtue.
  • being overly worried about one's health
  • Synonyms

    * hypochondriac

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A person in poor health or sickly, especially one who is constantly obsessed with their state of health
  • The most uninformed mind, with a healthy body, is happier than the wisest valetudinarian .'' -- Thomas Jefferson, ''The Writings of Thomas Jefferson (1904), p. 168.
    She affected to be spunky about her ailments and afflictions, but she was in fact an utterly self-centered valetudinarian'' (Louis Auchincloss) ''The American Heritage Dictionary
    The cuisine, of course, would not be such as would raise water bubbles in the mouth of a valetudinarian ; the carniverous propensity will mostly be gratified by steak which, when cut, will resemble the Mudhook Yacht Club burgee of ''rouge et noir''; and savory soups and luscious salmon will be luxuries only obtainable in "cannister" form.'' -- Dixon Kemp, ''A Manual of Yacht and Boat Sailing (4th Ed.), 1884.

    Synonyms

    * hypochondriac

    References

    *

    valetudinarianism

    English

    Noun

    (-)
  • The condition of a valetudinarian; a state of feeble health; infirmity.
  • References

    *