Upwelling vs Plume - What's the difference?

upwelling | plume |


As nouns the difference between upwelling and plume

is that upwelling is an upward movement from a lower source while plume is a feather of a bird, especially a large or showy one.

As a verb plume is

to preen and arrange the feathers of.

upwelling

Noun

(en noun)
  • An upward movement from a lower source.
  • * 2009 , (Diarmaid MacCulloch), A History of Christianity , Penguin 2010, p. 873:
  • Rather separate from the abolitionist campaign, although likewise led by anglophone Evangelicals, was a sudden upwelling of commitment to worldwide mission.
  • the oceanographic phenomenon that occurs when strong, usually seasonal, winds push water away from the coast, bringing cold, nutrient-rich deep waters up to the surface
  • plume

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A feather of a bird, especially a large or showy one.
  • * Milton
  • wings of many a coloured plume
  • The furry tail of certain dog breeds (e.g. Samoyed, Malteagle) that stands erect or curls over their backs.
  • A cluster of feathers worn as an ornament, especially on a helmet.
  • * Dryden
  • his high plume , that nodded o'er his head
  • A token of honour or prowess; that on which one prides himself; a prize or reward.
  • * Milton
  • ambitious to win from me some plume
  • An upward spray of water or mist.
  • (geology) An upwelling of molten material from the Earth's mantle.
  • (astronomy) An arc of glowing material erupting from the surface of a star.
  • A large and flexible panicle of inflorescence resembling a feather, such as is seen in certain large ornamental grasses.
  • Derived terms

    * plume grass * plume moth * plume nutmeg

    Verb

    (plum)
  • To preen and arrange the feathers of.
  • * Washington Irving
  • pluming her wings among the breezy bowers
  • To congratulate (oneself) proudly.
  • He plumes himself on his skill.
    (South)
  • To strip of feathers; to pluck; to strip; to pillage; also, to peel.
  • (Francis Bacon)
    (Dryden)
  • To adorn with feathers or plumes.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Farewell the plumed troop.
  • To form a plume.
  • Smoke plumed from his pipe then slowly settled towards the floor.
  • To write; to pen.
  • *
  • We mention this observation, not with any view of pretending to account for so odd a behaviour, but lest some critic should hereafter plume himself on discovering it.