Winnow vs Unwinnowed - What's the difference?

winnow | unwinnowed |


As a verb winnow

is (agriculture) to subject (granular material, especially food grain) to a current of air separating heavier and lighter components, as grain from chaff.

As a noun winnow

is that which winnows or which is used in winnowing; a contrivance for fanning or winnowing grain.

As an adjective unwinnowed is

not winnowed.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

winnow

English

Verb

(en verb)
  • (agriculture) To subject (granular material, especially food grain) to a current of air separating heavier and lighter components, as grain from chaff.
  • *
  • (figuratively) To separate, sift, analyze, or test in this manner.
  • They winnowed the field to twelve.
    They winnowed the winners from the losers.
    They winnowed the losers from the winners.
  • (literary) To blow upon or toss about by blowing; to set in motion as with a fan or wings.
  • * 1872 Elliott Coues, Key to North American Birds
  • Gulls average much larger than terns, with stouter build; the feet are larger and more ambulatorial, the wings are shorter and not so thin; the birds winnow the air in a steady course unlike the buoyant dashing flight of their relatives.
  • (intransitive, literary, dated) To move about with a flapping motion, as of wings; to flutter.
  • Usage notes

    * Used with adverb or preposition "down"; see also winnow down. * Used with adverbs or prepositions "through", "away", and "out".

    Derived terms

    * winnow down * winnower * winnowing basket * winnowing fan * winnowing machine * winnow sheet * winnow grain from chaff * winnow the wheat from the chaff

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • That which winnows or which is used in winnowing; a contrivance for fanning or winnowing grain.
  • References

    * * *

    unwinnowed

    English

    Adjective

    (-)
  • Not winnowed.
  • *{{quote-book, year=1857, author=S. H. Hammond, title=Wild Northern Scenes, chapter=, edition= citation
  • , passage=While stooping over to fill his fan with unwinnowed grain, the buck, taking advantage of his position, came like a catapult against him, and sent him like a ball from a Paixhan gun, head foremost into the chaff. }}
  • *{{quote-book, year=1907, author=William J. Dawson, title=The Quest of the Simple Life, chapter=, edition= citation
  • , passage=A few miles away the loud Niagara of London runs swift, and the air vibrates with all the tumult of the strenuous life of man; but here the air is dead, unwinnowed by any clamorous wind, unshaken by any planetary motion. }}