Trample vs Untrampled - What's the difference?

trample | untrampled |


As a verb trample

is to crush something by walking on it.

As a noun trample

is the sound of heavy footsteps.

As an adjective untrampled is

not trampled.

trample

English

Verb

(trampl)
  • To crush something by walking on it.
  • to trample grass or flowers
  • * Bible, Matthew vii. 6
  • Neither cast ye your pearls before swine, lest they trample them under their feet.
  • *{{quote-book, year=1963, author=(Margery Allingham)
  • , title=(The China Governess) , chapter=Foreword citation , passage=Everything a living animal could do to destroy and to desecrate bed and walls had been done. […]  A canister of flour from the kitchen had been thrown at the looking-glass and lay like trampled snow over the remains of a decent blue suit with the lining ripped out which lay on top of the ruin of a plastic wardrobe.}}
  • (by extension) To treat someone harshly.
  • To walk heavily and destructively.
  • * Charles Dickens
  • (by extension) To cause emotional injury as if by trampling.
  • (Cowper)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • the sound of heavy footsteps
  • Anagrams

    * ----

    untrampled

    English

    Adjective

    (-)
  • Not trampled.