Team vs Unit - What's the difference?

team | unit |


As nouns the difference between team and unit

is that team is a set of draught animals, such as two horses in front of a carriage while unit is (sciences) a standard measure of a quantity.

As a verb team

is to form a group, as for sports or work or team can be .

As an adjective unit is

for each unit.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

team

English

(wikipedia team)

Etymology 1

From (etyl) teme, from (etyl) . More at (l), (l).

Noun

(en noun)
  • A set of draught animals, such as two horses in front of a carriage.
  • * Macaulay
  • It happened almost every day that coaches stuck fast, until a team of cattle could be procured from some neighbouring farm to tug them out of the slough.
  • * 1931 , William Faulkner, Sanctuary , Vintage 1993, p. 111:
  • The adjacent alleys were choked with tethered wagons, the teams reversed and nuzzling gnawed corn-ears over the tail-boards.
  • Any group of people involved in the same activity, especially sports or work.
  • We need more volunteers for the netball team .
    The IT manager leads a team of three software developers.
  • (obsolete) A group of animals moving together, especially young ducks.
  • * Holland
  • a team of ducklings about her
  • * Dryden
  • a long team of snowy swans on high
  • (UK, legal, obsolete) A royalty or privilege granted by royal charter to a lord of a manor, of having, keeping, and judging in his court, his bondmen, neifes, and villains, and their offspring, or suit, that is, goods and chattels, and appurtenances thereto.
  • * ALEXANDER M. BURRILL, LAW DICTIONARY & GLOSSARY, vol II, 1871 URL: http://www.archive.org/details/cu31924022836450
  • TEAM, Theam, Tem, Them. Sax. [from tyman, to propagate, to teem.] In old English law. Literally, an offspring, race or generation. A royalty or privilege granted by royal charter to a lord of a manor, of having, keeping and judging in his court, his bondmen, neifes and villeins, and their offspring or suit. They who had a jurisdiction of this kind, were said to have a court of Theme... constantly used in the old books in connection with toll, in the expression Toll & Team.
    Usage notes
    * When referring to the actions of a sports team, British English typically uses the third-person plural form rather than the third-person singular. However, this is not done in other contexts such as in business or politics. ** **: Manchester were unable to bring the strong team they originally intended, ** **: Leeds were champions again.
    Descendants
    * German: (l)

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To form a group, as for sports or work.
  • They teamed to complete the project.
  • To convey or haul with a team.
  • to team lumber
    (Thoreau)
    Derived terms
    * double-team

    Etymology 2

    Verb

    (head)
  • unit

    English

    (Unit)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (sciences) A standard measure of a quantity.
  • The centimetre is a unit of length.
  • The number one.
  • This pill provides 500 units of Vitamin E.
  • An organized group comprising people and/or equipment.
  • He was a member of a special police unit .
  • (military, informal) A member of a military organization.
  • The fifth tank brigade moved in with 20 units .'' (''i.e., 20 tanks )
  • (US, military) Any military element whose structure is prescribed by competent authority, such as a table of organization and equipment; specifically, part of an organizationJoint Publication 1-02 U.S. Department of Defense Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms; 12 April 2001 (As Amended Through 14 April 2006). .
  • (US, military) An organization title of a subdivision of a group in a task force.
  • (US, military) A standard or basic quantity into which an item of supply is divided, issued or used. In this meaning, also called unit of issue.
  • (US, military) With regard to Reserve Components of the Armed Forces, denotes a Selected Reserve unit organized, equipped, and trained for mobilization to serve on active duty as a unit or to augment or be augmented by another unit. Headquarters and support functions without wartime missions are not considered units.
  • (algebra) An element of a ring having a multiplicative inverse. (Formerly just the identity element 1R of a ring.)
  • (geology) A volume of rock or ice of identifiable origin and age range that is defined by the distinctive and dominant, easily mapped and recognizable petrographic, lithologic or paleontologic features (facies) that characterize it.
  • (commerce) An item which may be sold singly.
  • We shipped nearly twice as many units this month as last month.
  • (UK, electricity) One kilowatt-hour (as recorded on an electricity meter).
  • (Australia, New Zealand) a measure of housing equivalent to the living quarters of one household, an apartment where a group of apartments is contained in one or more multi-storied buildings or a group of dwellings is in one or more single storey buildings, usually arranged around a driveway.
  • (historical) A gold coin of the reign of James I, worth twenty shillings.
  • (Camden)

    Synonyms

    * (identity element) identity element, unit element

    Adjective

    (-)
  • For each unit.
  • We have to keep our unit costs down if we want to make a profit.
  • (mathematics) Having a size or magnitude of one.
  • * 1990 , William W. S. Wei, Time Series Analysis , ISBN 0201159112, page 9:
  • Consider the following time sequence
  • *:: Z_t=A\sin(\omega t+\theta),
  • where A is a random variable with a zero mean and a unit variance and \theta is a random variable with a uniform distribution on the interval [-\pi,\pi] independent of A.

    Derived terms

    * construction unit * tractor unit * unit aircraft * unitality * unit cost * unit combat readiness * unit commitment status * unit designation list

    References

    Anagrams

    * 1000 English basic words ----