Related terms

What is the difference between nonsensical and nonsense?

nonsensical | nonsense | Related terms |

Nonsense is a related term of nonsensical.

Nonsensical is a derived term of nonsense.


As a adjective nonsensical

is without sense; unmeaning; absurd; foolish; irrational; preposterous.

As a noun nonsense is

letters or words, in writing or speech, that have no meaning or seem to have no meaning.

As a verb nonsense is

to make nonsense of.

What is the difference between gratuitous and gratis?

gratuitous | gratis | Related terms |

Gratis is a related term of gratuitous.

Gratuitous is a related term of gratis.


As adjectives the difference between gratuitous and gratis

is that gratuitous is given freely; unearned while gratis is free, without charge.

As a adverb gratis is

free, without charge.

What is the difference between encyclopedical and encyclopedia?

encyclopedical | encyclopedia | Related terms |

Encyclopedical is a related term of encyclopedia.


As a adjective encyclopedical

is {{context|american spelling|lang=en}} (encyclopaedical).

As a noun encyclopedia is

a comprehensive reference work (often spanning several printed volumes) with in-depth articles (usually arranged in alphabetical order, or sometimes arranged by category) on a range of subjects, sometimes general, sometimes limited to a particular field.

What is the difference between carnation and incarnadine?

carnation | incarnadine | Related terms |

Incarnadine is a related term of carnation.


As nouns the difference between carnation and incarnadine

is that carnation is (botany) a type of eurasian plant widely cultivated for its flowers while incarnadine is the blood red colour of raw flesh.

As adjectives the difference between carnation and incarnadine

is that carnation is of a rosy pink or red colour, like human flesh while incarnadine is of the blood red colour of raw flesh.

As a verb incarnadine is

to cause to be the blood-red colour of raw flesh.

What is the difference between act and active?

act | active | Related terms |

Act is a related term of active.

Active is a related term of act.


As nouns the difference between act and active

is that act is {{context|countable|lang=en}} something done, a deed while active is a person or thing that is acting or capable of acting.

As a verb act

is {{context|intransitive|lang=en}} to do something.

As a adjective active is

having the power or quality of acting; causing change; communicating action or motion; acting; — opposed to passive, that receives; as, certain active principles; the powers of the mind.

What is the difference between marchion and march?

marchion | march | Related terms |

Marchion is a related term of march.

What is the difference between marquisate and march?

marquisate | march | Related terms |

Marquisate is a related term of march.


As nouns the difference between marquisate and march

is that marquisate is the territory held by a marquis or margrave while march is a formal, rhythmic way of walking, used especially by soldiers, bands and in ceremonies or march can be {{context|now|_|archaic|historical|lang=en}} a border region, especially one originally set up to defend a boundary.

As a verb march is

to walk with long, regular strides, as a soldier does or march can be {{context|intransitive|lang=en}} to have common borders or frontiers.

What is the difference between in and inmost?

in | inmost | Related terms |

Inmost is a related term of in.


As adjectives the difference between in and inmost

is that in is in fashion; popular while inmost is the very deepest within; farthest from the surface or external part; innermost.

As a preposition in

is contained by.

As a verb in

is {{context|obsolete|transitive|lang=en}} to enclose; to take in; to harvest.

As a adverb in

is {{context|not comparable|lang=en}} located indoors, especially: at home or the office .

As a noun in

is a position of power or a way to get it or in can be inch.

What is the difference between army and armour?

army | armour | Related terms |

Armour is a related term of army.


As nouns the difference between army and armour

is that army is a large, highly organized military force, concerned mainly with ground (rather than air or naval) operations while armour is {{alternative spelling of|armor|from=british|from2=canadian}}.

As a verb armour is

{{alternative spelling of|armor|from=british|from2=canadian}}.

What is the difference between army and arms?

army | arms | Related terms |

Arms is a related term of army.


As nouns the difference between army and arms

is that army is a large, highly organized military force, concerned mainly with ground (rather than air or naval) operations while arms is (arm) or arms can be {{context|pluralonly|lang=en}} weapons.

As a verb arms is

(arm).

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