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Converse vs Twitch - What's the difference?

converse | twitch |

As verbs the difference between converse and twitch

is that converse is while twitch is to perform a twitch; spasm.

As a noun twitch is

a brief, small (sometimes involuntary) movement out of place and then back again; a spasm or twitch can be couch grass, elymus repens ; a species of grass, often considered as a weed.

converse

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl)

Verb

(convers)
  • (formal) To talk; to engage in conversation.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Companions / That do converse and waste the time together.
  • * Dryden
  • We had conversed so often on that subject.
  • To keep company; to hold intimate intercourse; to commune; followed by with .
  • * Thomson
  • To seek the distant hills, and there converse / With nature.
  • * Sir Walter Scott
  • Conversing with the world, we use the world's fashions.
  • * Wordsworth
  • But to converse with heaven — This is not easy.
  • (obsolete) To have knowledge of (a thing), from long intercourse or study.
  • * John Locke
  • according as the objects they converse with afford greater or less variety
    Derived terms
    * conversation

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Familiar discourse; free interchange of thoughts or views; conversation; chat.
  • * 1728 , (Edward Young), Love of Fame, the Universal Passion , Satire V, On Women, lines 44-46:
  • Twice ere the sun descends, with zeal inspir'd, / From the vain converse of the world retir'd, / She reads the psalms and chapters for the day [...].
  • * 1919 , (Saki), ‘The Disappearance of Crispina Umerleigh’, The Toys of Peace'', Penguin 2000 (''Complete Short Stories ), p. 405:
  • In a first-class carriage of a train speeding Balkanward across the flat, green Hungarian plain, two Britons sat in friendly, fitful converse .

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl)

    Adjective

    (-)
  • Opposite; reversed in order or relation; reciprocal.
  • a converse proposition

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The opposite or reverse.
  • (logic) Of a proposition or theorem of the form: given that "If A is true, then B is true", then "If B is true, then A is true."''
    equivalently: ''given that "All Xs are Ys", then "All Ys are Xs"
    .
  • All trees are plants, but the converse , that all plants are trees, is not true.
    Derived terms
    * conversely

    Anagrams

    * * English heteronyms ----

    twitch

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) twicchen, from (etyl) twiccian, from (etyl) ).

    Noun

    (es)
  • A brief, small (sometimes involuntary) movement out of place and then back again; a spasm.
  • I saw a little twitch in the man's face, and knew he was lying.
  • (informal) Action of spotting or seeking out a bird, especially a rare one.
  • (farriery) A stick with a hole in one end through which passes a loop, which can be drawn tightly over the upper lip or an ear of a horse and twisted to keep the animal quiet during minor surgery.
  • Derived terms
    * nervous twitch

    Verb

  • To perform a twitch; spasm.
  • * (rfdate) — [http://www.mindspring.com/~randyhoward/new_page_6.htm]
  • "Why is it that you twitch whenever I say Faith?"
  • * 1922 , (Margery Williams), (The Velveteen Rabbit)
  • *:Their feet padded softly on the ground, and they crept quite close to him, twitching their noses...
  • To jerk sharply and briefly.
  • to twitch somebody's sleeve for attention
  • * Alexander Pope
  • Thrice they twitched the diamond in her ear.
  • To spot or seek out a bird, especially a rare one.
  • * 1995 , Quarterly Review of Biology vol. 70 p. 348:
  • "The Birdwatchers Handbook ... will be a clear asset to those who 'twitch' in Europe."
  • * 2003 , Mark Cocker, Birders: Tales of a Tribe [http://books.google.com/books?id=tv-Noj1Fvc0C], ISBN 0802139965, page 52:
  • "But the key revelation from twitching that wonderful Iceland Gull on 10 March 1974 wasn't its eroticism. It was the sheer innocence of it."
  • * 2005 , Sean Dooley, The Big Twitch: One Man, One Continent, a Race Against Time [http://books.google.com/books?id=fWLmpqL4EMsC], ISBN 1741145287, page 119:
  • "I hadn't seen John since I went to Adelaide to (unsuccessfully) twitch the '87 Northern Shoveler, when I was a skinny, eighteen- year-old kid. "
    Usage notes
    When used of birdwatchers by ignorant outsiders, this term frequently carries a negative connotation.
    Derived terms
    * atwitch

    Etymology 2

    alternate of quitch

    Noun

    (-)
  • couch grass, Elymus repens ; a species of grass, often considered as a weed.