Twirp vs Twire - What's the difference?

twirp | twire |


As nouns the difference between twirp and twire

is that twirp is while twire is a sly glance; a leer or twire can be a twisted filament; a thread.

As an interjection twirp

is an imitation of the sound of a bird or a horn.

As a verb twire is

to glance shyly or slyly; look askance; make eyes; leer; peer; pry or twire can be to twist; twirl.

twirp

English

Etymology 1

Onomatopoeia, like chirp .

Interjection

(en interjection)
  • An imitation of the sound of a bird or a horn.
  • * 1898 , Metropolitan: Volume 7 , page 520:
  • The hounds are impatient. "Twirp', '''twirp''', ' twirp !" goes the horn, and "Crack, crack, crack!" responds the whip. It is a chorus that stirs the blood of the veteran as well as that of the uninitiated fox-hunter.
  • * 1996 , Garrett Barbuto, Boy's Life , August, page 54:
  • The first guy climbed up a tree and the farmer yelled, "Who is in my tree?" "Twirp', ' twirp ," replied the first guy. "Meow," replied the second guy.

    Etymology 2

    , possibly derived from the onomatopoeia. See twerp .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • * 1924 , Munsey's Magazine: Volume 81 , page 561:
  • Don't be such a twirp . I'll be back in twenty minutes. Watch the clock! Time me! I'm going to take the bus.

    twire

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) . More at (l).

    Alternative forms

    * (l)

    Verb

    (twir)
  • To glance shyly or slyly; look askance; make eyes; leer; peer; pry.
  • * Beaumont and Fletcher
  • I saw the wench that twired and twinkled at thee.
  • * Ben Jonson
  • Which maids will twire 'tween their fingers.
  • To twinkle; sparkle; wink.
  • * Shakespeare
  • When sparkling stars twire not.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A sly glance; a leer.
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl) . More at (l).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A twisted filament; a thread.
  • (John Locke)

    Etymology 3

    Perhaps from a dialectal form of *. Compare (l), (l).

    Verb

    (twir)
  • To twist; twirl.