Twirl vs Twine - What's the difference?

twirl | twine |


In intransitive terms the difference between twirl and twine

is that twirl is to perform a twirl while twine is to ascend in spiral lines about a support; to climb spirally.

In transitive terms the difference between twirl and twine

is that twirl is to rotate rapidly while twine is to wind about; to embrace; to entwine.

twirl

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • A movement where one spins round elegantly; a pirouette.
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • To perform a twirl.
  • To rotate rapidly.
  • * Dodsley
  • See ruddy maids, / Some taught with dexterous hand to twirl the wheel.
  • * Byron
  • No more beneath soft eve's consenting star / Fandango twirls his jocund castanet.

    References

    twine

    English

    Alternative forms

    * (l) (obsolete)

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) twine, twyne, twin, from (etyl) . More at (l).

    Noun

    (wikipedia twine) (en noun)
  • A twist; a convolution.
  • * Milton
  • Typhon huge, ending in snaky twine .
  • A strong thread composed of two or three smaller threads or strands twisted together, and used for various purposes, as for binding small parcels, making nets, and the like; a small cord or string.
  • The act of twining or winding round.
  • Intimate and suggestive dance gyrations.
  • 1965 Pickett, Wilson , Don't Fight It (blues song), BMI Music.
  • :* The way you jerk, the way you do the twine / You're too much, baby; I'd like to make you mine [...]
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl) twinen, twynen, from (etyl) *.

    Verb

    (twin)
  • To weave together.
  • To wind, as one thread around another, or as any flexible substance around another body.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Let me twine / Mine arms about that body.
  • To wind about; to embrace; to entwine.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • Let wreaths of triumph now my temples twine .
  • To mutually twist together; to become mutually involved; to intertwine.
  • To wind; to bend; to make turns; to meander.
  • * Jonathan Swift
  • As rivers, though they bend and twine , / Still to the sea their course incline.
  • To ascend in spiral lines about a support; to climb spirally.
  • Many plants twine .
  • (obsolete) To turn round; to revolve.
  • (Chapman)
  • (obsolete) To change the direction of.
  • (Fairfax)
  • (obsolete) To mingle; to mix.
  • (Crashaw)
    Derived terms
    * (l) * (l)