Tusk vs Tuskwise - What's the difference?

tusk | tuskwise |


As a noun tusk

is one of a pair of elongated pointed teeth that extend outside the mouth of an animal such as walrus, elephant or wild boar or tusk can be a fish, the torsk.

As a verb tusk

is to dig up using a tusk, as boars do.

As an adverb tuskwise is

(rare) in the manner of tusks.

tusk

English

(wikipedia tusk)

Etymology 1

From (etyl) tusk (also tux, tusch), from (etyl) . More at (l).

Noun

(en noun)
  • One of a pair of elongated pointed teeth that extend outside the mouth of an animal such as walrus, elephant or wild boar.
  • Until the CITES sales ban, elephant tusks were the 'backbone' of the legal ivory trade.
  • A small projection on a (tusk) tenon.
  • A tusk shell.
  • (carpentry) A projecting member like a tenon, and serving the same or a similar purpose, but composed of several steps, or offsets, called teeth .
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • To dig up using a tusk, as boars do.
  • (obsolete) To bare or gnash the teeth.
  • References

    * *

    Etymology 2

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A fish, the torsk.
  • (Webster 1913) ----

    tuskwise

    English

    Adverb

    (-)
  • (rare) In the manner of tusks.
  • * Elizabeth Barrett Browning
  • Nay without this law / Of mandom, ye would perish, — beast by beast / Devouring, — tree by tree, with strangling roots / And trunks set tuskwise .
  • * 1941 , Charles Fort, Lo!
  • ...part of the jaw bone of a whale, propped up tuskwise .
  • * 2008 , Kage Baker, The Sons of Heaven
  • Alec laughs so hard his eyes glaze and his cheeks flush, and even Nicholas is chortling now. Edward forges ahead, holding up his fingers tuskwise ...