Hucked vs Tucked - What's the difference?

hucked | tucked |


As verbs the difference between hucked and tucked

is that hucked is (huck) while tucked is (tuck).

hucked

English

Verb

(head)
  • (huck)

  • huck

    English

    Verb

  • (Ultimate Frisbee) To throw a long way
  • (informal) to throw or chuck
  • He was so angry he hucked the book at my face.
  • (mountain biking) To gain extra height from a jump by compressing the springs just before the take-off
  • Longer forks make the bike more cumbersome, but you will be able to huck off of more stuff.
    If you huck it (the take-off), you'll drop about 20 feet.
  • (mountain biking) To make a maneuver in a clumsy way.
  • (whitewater kayaking) To paddle off of a waterfall or to boof a big drop.
  • I hucked a sweet 25 foot waterfall on the Tomata River.
  • (dated) To haggle in trading.
  • (snowboarding, skiing) To throw oneself off a large jump or drop.
  • Dude go huck that cornice!

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (Ultimate Frisbee) Long throw, generally at least half a field or more.
  • (skiing, snowboarding) a drop or jump off of a cliff or cornice
  • tucked

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (tuck)

  • tuck

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) . More at touch.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (lb) To pull or gather up (an item of fabric).
  • (lb) To push into a snug position; to place somewhere safe or somewhat hidden.
  • :
  • *
  • *:It was flood-tide along Fifth Avenue; motor, brougham, and victoria swept by on the glittering current; pretty women glanced out from limousine and tonneau; young men of his own type, silk-hatted, frock-coated, the crooks of their walking sticks tucked up under their left arms, passed on the Park side.
  • (lb) To fit neatly.
  • :
  • To curl into a ball; to fold up and hold one's legs.
  • :
  • To sew folds; to make a tuck or tucks in.
  • :
  • To full, as cloth.
  • To conceal one’s genitals, as with a gaff or by fastening them down with adhesive tape.
  • :
  • (lb) To keep the thumb in position while moving the rest of the hand over it to continue playing keys that are outside the thumb.
  • Antonyms
    * untuck
    Derived terms
    * tuck away * tuck in * tuck into * nip and tuck

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • An act of tucking ; a pleat or fold.
  • (sewing) A fold in fabric that has been stitched in place from end to end, as to reduce the overall dimension of the fabric piece.
  • A curled position.
  • (medicine, surgery) A plastic surgery technique to remove excess skin.
  • (music, piano, when playing scales on piano keys) The act of keeping the thumb in position while moving the rest of the hand over it to continue playing keys that are outside the thumb.
  • (diving) A curled position, with the shins held towards the body.
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (archaic) A rapier, a sword.
  • * 1663 , (Hudibras) , by (Samuel Butler), part 1,
  • [...] with force he labour'd / To free's blade from retentive scabbard; / And after many a painful pluck, / From rusty durance he bail'd tuck [...]
    (Shakespeare)
  • * Sir Walter Scott
  • He wore large hose, and a tuck , as it was then called, or rapier, of tremendous length.

    Etymology 3

    Compare tocsin.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The beat of a drum.
  • Etymology 4

    (etyl) .

    Noun

    (-)
  • Food, especially snack food.
  • Derived terms
    * tuck shop * tuck box * tuck in ----