Drove vs Troupe - What's the difference?

drove | troupe |


As nouns the difference between drove and troupe

is that drove is a number of cattle driven to market or new pastures while troupe is a company of, often touring, actors, singers or dancers.

As verbs the difference between drove and troupe

is that drove is (drive) while troupe is to tour with a troupe.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

drove

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) drove, drof, draf, from (etyl) . More at (l).

Noun

(en noun)
  • A number of cattle driven to market or new pastures.
  • (usually, in the plural) A large number of people on the move (literally or figuratively).
  • 2009', Erik Zachte: ''New editors are joining English Wikipedia in '''droves !
  • A road or track along which cattle are habitually driven
  • Derived terms

    * in droves

    Etymology 2

    From earlier drave, from (etyl) drave, draf, from (etyl) .

    Verb

    (drov)
  • (drive).
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=2 , passage=I had occasion […] to make a somewhat long business trip to Chicago, and on my return […] I found Farrar awaiting me in the railway station. He smiled his wonted fraction by way of greeting, […], and finally leading me to his buggy, turned and drove out of town.}}
  • To herd cattle; particularly over a long distance.
  • troupe

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A company of, often touring, actors, singers or dancers.
  • Any group of people working together on a shared activity.
  • Verb

    (troup)
  • To tour with a troupe.
  • Derived terms

    * trouper * super trouper

    See also

    *