Troop vs Crotchet - What's the difference?

troop | crotchet |


In context|military|lang=en terms the difference between troop and crotchet

is that troop is (military) a small unit of cavalry or armour commanded by a captain, corresponding to a platoon or company of infantry while crotchet is (military) the arrangement of a body of troops, either forward or rearward, so as to form a line nearly perpendicular to the general line of battle.

As nouns the difference between troop and crotchet

is that troop is a collection of people; a company; a number; a multitude while crotchet is (music) a musical note one beat long in 4/4 time.

As verbs the difference between troop and crotchet

is that troop is to move in numbers; to come or gather in crowds or troops while crotchet is to make needlework by looping thread with a hooked needle; to crochet.

troop

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • A collection of people; a company; a number; a multitude.
  • * Shakespeare
  • That which should accompany old age — / As honour, love, obedience, troops of friends — / I must not look to have.
  • (military) A small unit of cavalry or armour commanded by a captain, corresponding to a platoon or company of infantry.
  • A detachment of soldiers or police, especially horse artillery, armour, or state troopers.
  • Soldiers, military forces (usually "troops").
  • * Shakespeare
  • Farewell the plumed troop , and the big wars.
  • * Macaulay
  • His troops moved to victory with the precision of machines.
  • (nonstandard) A company of stageplayers; a troupe.
  • (label) A basic unit of girl or boy scouts, consisting of 6 to 10 youngsters.
  • A group of baboons.
  • A particular roll of the drum; a quick march.
  • (mycology) Mushrooms that are in a close group but not close enough to be called a cluster.
  • Derived terms

    * trooper * troopship * troop carrier

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To move in numbers; to come or gather in crowds or troops.
  • * , chapter=5
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=Then everybody once more knelt, and soon the blessing was pronounced. The choir and the clergy trooped out slowly, […], down the nave to the western door. […] At a seemingly immense distance the surpliced group stopped to say the last prayer.}}
  • To march on; to go forward in haste.
  • To move or march as if in a crowd.
  • Derived terms

    * troop the colour (qualifier)

    References

    * *

    See also

    *

    Anagrams

    * English collective nouns ----

    crotchet

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (music) A musical note one beat long in 4/4 time.
  • A sharp curve or crook; a shape resembling a hook (obsolete except in crochet hook).
  • (archaic) a whim or a fancy
  • * 1843 , '', book 3, chapter XIII, ''Democracy
  • Thou who walkest in a vain shew, looking out with ornamental dilettante sniff and serene supremacy at all Life and all Death; and amblest jauntily; perking up thy poor talk into crotchets , thy poor conduct into fatuous somnambulisms
  • * De Quincey
  • He ruined himself and all that trusted in him by crotchets that he could never explain to any rational man.
  • A forked support; a crotch.
  • * Dryden
  • The crotchets of their cot in columns rise.
  • (military, historical) An indentation in the glacis of the covered way, at a point where a traverse is placed.
  • (military) The arrangement of a body of troops, either forward or rearward, so as to form a line nearly perpendicular to the general line of battle.
  • (printing) A bracket.
  • Synonyms

    * (musical note) quarter note (US)

    Derived terms

    * crotchety

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • to make needlework by looping thread with a hooked needle; to crochet
  • (obsolete) to play music in measured time
  • (Donne)
    ---- ==Jèrriais==

    Noun

    (m)
  • (punctuation) bracket
  • Derived terms

    *