Trivial vs Stickle - What's the difference?

trivial | stickle |


In context|obsolete|lang=en terms the difference between trivial and stickle

is that trivial is (obsolete) any of the three liberal arts forming the trivium while stickle is (obsolete) to act as referee or arbiter; to mediate.

As nouns the difference between trivial and stickle

is that trivial is (obsolete) any of the three liberal arts forming the trivium while stickle is (uk|dialect) a shallow rapid in a river.

As an adjective trivial

is ignorable; of little significance or value.

As a verb stickle is

(obsolete) to act as referee or arbiter; to mediate.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

trivial

English

Adjective

(en adjective)
  • Ignorable; of little significance or value.
  • * 1848, , Bantam Classics (1997), 16:
  • "All which details, I have no doubt, Jones , who reads this book at his Club, will pronounce to be excessively foolish, trivial , twaddling, and ultra-sentimental."
  • Commonplace, ordinary.
  • * De Quincey
  • As a scholar, meantime, he was trivial , and incapable of labour.
  • Concerned with or involving trivia.
  • (biology) Relating to or designating the name of a species; specific as opposed to generic.
  • (mathematics) Of, relating to, or being the simplest possible case.
  • (mathematics) Self-evident.
  • Pertaining to the trivium.
  • (philosophy) Indistinguishable in case of truth or falsity.
  • Synonyms

    * (of little significance) ignorable, negligible, trifling

    Antonyms

    * nontrivial * important * significant * radical * fundamental

    Derived terms

    * trivia

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) Any of the three liberal arts forming the trivium.
  • (Skelton)
    (Wood)
    (Webster 1913) ----

    stickle

    English

    Verb

    (en-verb)
  • (obsolete) To act as referee or arbiter; to mediate.
  • To argue or struggle (for).
  • * 1897 , Henry James, What Maisie Knew :
  • ‘She has other people than poor little you to think about, and has gone abroad with them; so you needn't be in the least afraid she'll stickle this time for her rights.’
  • To raise objections; to argue stubbornly, especially over minor or trivial matters.
  • (obsolete) To separate, as combatants; hence, to quiet, to appease, as disputants.
  • * Drayton
  • Which [question] violently they pursue, / Nor stickled would they be.
  • (obsolete) To intervene in; to stop, or put an end to, by intervening.
  • * Sir Philip Sidney
  • They ran to him, and, pulling him back by force, stickled that unnatural fray.
  • (obsolete) To separate combatants by intervening.
  • * Dryden
  • When he [the angel] sees half of the Christians killed, and the rest in a fair way of being routed, he stickles betwixt the remainder of God's host and the race of fiends.
  • (obsolete) To contend, contest, or altercate, especially in a pertinacious manner on insufficient grounds.
  • * Hudibras
  • Fortune, as she's wont, turned fickle, / And for the foe began to stickle .
  • * Dryden
  • for paltry punk they roar and stickle
  • * Hazlitt
  • the obstinacy with which he stickles for the wrong

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (UK, dialect) A shallow rapid in a river.
  • (UK, dialect) The current below a waterfall.
  • * W. Browne
  • Patient anglers, standing all the day / Near to some shallow stickle or deep bay.

    Anagrams

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