Spider vs Tree - What's the difference?

spider | tree |


As nouns the difference between spider and tree

is that spider is any of various eight-legged, predatory arthropods, of the order araneae , most of which spin webs to catch prey while tree is a large plant, not exactly defined, but typically over four meters in height, a single trunk which grows in girth with age and branches (which also grow in circumference with age).

As verbs the difference between spider and tree

is that spider is (internet|of a computer program) to follow links on the world wide web in order to gather information while tree is to chase (an animal or person) up a tree.

spider

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • Any of various eight-legged, predatory arthropods, of the order Araneae , most of which spin webs to catch prey.
  • (Internet) A program which follows links on the World Wide Web in order to gather information.
  • (chiefly, Australia, and, New Zealand) A float (drink) made by mixing ice-cream and a soda or fizzy drink (such as lemonade).
  • * 2002', Katharine Gasparini, ''Cranberry and vanilla ice cream '''spider'' , recipe in ''Cool Food , page 339.
  • (slang) A spindly person.
  • (slang) A man who persistently approaches or accosts a woman in a public social setting, particularly in a bar.
  • (snooker, billiards) A stick with a convex arch-shaped notched head used to support the cue when the cue ball is out of reach at normal extension; a bridge.
  • (cookware, US, UK, historical) A cast-iron frying pan with three legs, once common in open-hearth cookery.
  • * 1846 , Mary Hooker Cornelius, The Young Housekeeper's Friend , page 146, recipe 28 “To fry salt pork”:
  • Cut slices and lay them in cold water in the spider'; boil them up two or three minutes, then pour off the water and set the ' spider again on the coals and brown the slices on each side.
  • * 2005 , Marty Davidson, Grandma Grace's Southern Favorites , recipe for “strawberry coconuts”, Rutledge Hill Press, ISBN 1-4016-0219-3, page 193:
  • In spider pan or deep skillet set over hot coals, quickly fry a few at a time in deep lard until brown.
  • * 2008 , Corona Club (San Francisco, California), Corona Club Cook Book , page 202,
  • Melt ½ the dry sugar in the spider , stirring with knife until all is melted.
  • (cookware) Implement for moving food in and out of hot oil for deep frying, with a circular metal mesh attached to a long handle.
  • * 1996 , City and Guilds of London Institute, Food preparation and cooking. Cookery units. Student guide. , Stanley Thornes, ISBN 0-7487-2566-0, unit 2ND5, element 2, page 157:
  • If you are deep-frying your falafel, use a spider or basket to place them gently into the hot oil, which should be preheated to a temperature of 175°C (330°F).
  • * 2008 , Anna Kasabian and David Kasabian, The Wild Fish Cookbook , Creative Publishing International, ISBN 1-58923-317-4, page 84:
  • Consider investing in a frying basket or a spider' for small amounts of fish. A ' spider looks like a metal web and has a long handle and can lower and raise fish from the hot oil.
  • A part of a crank, to which the chainrings are attached
  • (slang) Heroin (street drug).
  • (music) Part of a resonator instrument that transmits string vibrations from the bridge to a resonator cone at multiple points.
  • A skeleton or frame with radiating arms or members, often connected by crosspieces, such as a casting forming the hub and spokes to which the rim of a fly wheel or large gear is bolted; the body of a piston head; or a frame for strengthening a core or mould for a casting.
  • Derived terms

    * (assassin spider) * (coconut spider) * (pelican spider) * spiderdom * spidership * spidery

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (Internet, of a computer program) to follow links on the World Wide Web in order to gather information.
  • ''The online dictionary is regularly spidered by search engines.

    Derived terms

    * Web spidering

    See also

    * arachnid * (wikipedia)

    Anagrams

    * ----

    tree

    English

    {{ picdic , image=Birnbaum am Lerchenberg retouched.jpg , text=tree (1) , detail1= , detail3= }}

    Noun

    (en-noun) (plural "treen" is obsolete)
  • A large plant, not exactly defined, but typically over four meters in height, a single trunk which grows in girth with age and branches (which also grow in circumference with age).
  • is the tallest living tree in the world.
    Birds have a nest in a tree in the garden.
  • Any plant that is reminiscent of the above but not classified as a tree in the strict botanical sense: for example the banana "tree".
  • An object made from a tree trunk and having multiple hooks]] or storage [[platform, platforms.
  • He had the choice of buying a scratching post or a cat tree .
  • A device used to hold or stretch a shoe open.
  • He put a shoe tree in each of his shoes.
  • The structural frame of a saddle.
  • (graph theory) A connected graph with no cycles or, equivalently, a connected graph with n'' vertices and ''n -1 edges.
  • (computing theory) A recursive data structure in which each node has zero or more nodes as children.
  • (graphical user interface) A display or listing of entries or elements such that there are primary and secondary entries shown, usually linked by drawn lines or by indenting to the right.
  • We’ll show it as a tree list.
  • Any structure or construct having branches akin to (1).
  • The structure or wooden frame used in the construction of a saddle used in horse riding.
  • (informal) Marijuana.
  • (obsolete) A cross or gallows.
  • Tyburn tree
  • * Bible, Acts x. 39
  • [Jesus] whom they slew and hanged on a tree .
  • (obsolete) wood; timber
  • * Wyclif Bible (2 Tim. ii. 20)
  • In a great house ben not only vessels of gold and of silver but also of tree and of earth.
  • (chemistry) A mass of crystals, aggregated in arborescent forms, obtained by precipitation of a metal from solution.
  • Derived terms

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    Proverbs

    * *

    Hypernyms

    * plant * (in graph theory) graph

    Hyponyms

    * oak, fir, pine * see also:

    Synonyms

    * sapling, seedling

    See also

    * * arboreal

    Verb

    (d)
  • To chase (an animal or person) up a tree.
  • The dog treed the cat.
  • To place upon a tree; to fit with a tree; to stretch upon a tree.
  • to tree a boot

    Statistics

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    Anagrams

    * * 1000 English basic words ----