Tree vs Ringbark - What's the difference?

tree | ringbark |


As verbs the difference between tree and ringbark

is that tree is to chase (an animal or person) up a tree while ringbark is to remove the bark from a tree in a ring all the way around its trunk, normally killing the tree (because nutrients are carried through the phloem, the layers immediately under the bark, which layers are damaged by the process).

As a noun tree

is a large plant, not exactly defined, but typically over four meters in height, a single trunk which grows in girth with age and branches (which also grow in circumference with age).

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

tree

English

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Noun

(en-noun) (plural "treen" is obsolete)
  • A large plant, not exactly defined, but typically over four meters in height, a single trunk which grows in girth with age and branches (which also grow in circumference with age).
  • is the tallest living tree in the world.
    Birds have a nest in a tree in the garden.
  • Any plant that is reminiscent of the above but not classified as a tree in the strict botanical sense: for example the banana "tree".
  • An object made from a tree trunk and having multiple hooks]] or storage [[platform, platforms.
  • He had the choice of buying a scratching post or a cat tree .
  • A device used to hold or stretch a shoe open.
  • He put a shoe tree in each of his shoes.
  • The structural frame of a saddle.
  • (graph theory) A connected graph with no cycles or, equivalently, a connected graph with n'' vertices and ''n -1 edges.
  • (computing theory) A recursive data structure in which each node has zero or more nodes as children.
  • (graphical user interface) A display or listing of entries or elements such that there are primary and secondary entries shown, usually linked by drawn lines or by indenting to the right.
  • We’ll show it as a tree list.
  • Any structure or construct having branches akin to (1).
  • The structure or wooden frame used in the construction of a saddle used in horse riding.
  • (informal) Marijuana.
  • (obsolete) A cross or gallows.
  • Tyburn tree
  • * Bible, Acts x. 39
  • [Jesus] whom they slew and hanged on a tree .
  • (obsolete) wood; timber
  • * Wyclif Bible (2 Tim. ii. 20)
  • In a great house ben not only vessels of gold and of silver but also of tree and of earth.
  • (chemistry) A mass of crystals, aggregated in arborescent forms, obtained by precipitation of a metal from solution.
  • Derived terms

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    Proverbs

    * *

    Hypernyms

    * plant * (in graph theory) graph

    Hyponyms

    * oak, fir, pine * see also:

    Synonyms

    * sapling, seedling

    See also

    * * arboreal

    Verb

    (d)
  • To chase (an animal or person) up a tree.
  • The dog treed the cat.
  • To place upon a tree; to fit with a tree; to stretch upon a tree.
  • to tree a boot

    Statistics

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    Anagrams

    * * 1000 English basic words ----

    ringbark

    English

    Alternative forms

    * ring-bark

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To remove the bark from a tree in a ring all the way around its trunk, normally killing the tree (because nutrients are carried through the phloem, the layers immediately under the bark, which layers are damaged by the process).
  • Usage notes

    Ring-bark seems about twice as common as ringbark (without hyphen) in books. Girdling is much more common in the US.