Tree vs Bark - What's the difference?

tree | bark |


As nouns the difference between tree and bark

is that tree is a large plant, not exactly defined, but typically over four meters in height, a single trunk which grows in girth with age and branches (which also grow in circumference with age) while bark is the short, loud, explosive sound uttered by a dog or bark can be (countable|uncountable) the exterior covering of the trunk and branches of a tree or bark can be (obsolete) a small sailing vessel, eg a pinnace or a fishing smack; a rowing boat or barge.

As verbs the difference between tree and bark

is that tree is to chase (an animal or person) up a tree while bark is to make a short, loud, explosive noise with the vocal organs (said of animals, especially dogs) or bark can be to strip the bark from; to peel.

tree

English

{{ picdic , image=Birnbaum am Lerchenberg retouched.jpg , text=tree (1) , detail1= , detail3= }}

Noun

(en-noun) (plural "treen" is obsolete)
  • A large plant, not exactly defined, but typically over four meters in height, a single trunk which grows in girth with age and branches (which also grow in circumference with age).
  • is the tallest living tree in the world.
    Birds have a nest in a tree in the garden.
  • Any plant that is reminiscent of the above but not classified as a tree in the strict botanical sense: for example the banana "tree".
  • An object made from a tree trunk and having multiple hooks]] or storage [[platform, platforms.
  • He had the choice of buying a scratching post or a cat tree .
  • A device used to hold or stretch a shoe open.
  • He put a shoe tree in each of his shoes.
  • The structural frame of a saddle.
  • (graph theory) A connected graph with no cycles or, equivalently, a connected graph with n'' vertices and ''n -1 edges.
  • (computing theory) A recursive data structure in which each node has zero or more nodes as children.
  • (graphical user interface) A display or listing of entries or elements such that there are primary and secondary entries shown, usually linked by drawn lines or by indenting to the right.
  • We’ll show it as a tree list.
  • Any structure or construct having branches akin to (1).
  • The structure or wooden frame used in the construction of a saddle used in horse riding.
  • (informal) Marijuana.
  • (obsolete) A cross or gallows.
  • Tyburn tree
  • * Bible, Acts x. 39
  • [Jesus] whom they slew and hanged on a tree .
  • (obsolete) wood; timber
  • * Wyclif Bible (2 Tim. ii. 20)
  • In a great house ben not only vessels of gold and of silver but also of tree and of earth.
  • (chemistry) A mass of crystals, aggregated in arborescent forms, obtained by precipitation of a metal from solution.
  • Derived terms

    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

    Proverbs

    * *

    Hypernyms

    * plant * (in graph theory) graph

    Hyponyms

    * oak, fir, pine * see also:

    Synonyms

    * sapling, seedling

    See also

    * * arboreal

    Verb

    (d)
  • To chase (an animal or person) up a tree.
  • The dog treed the cat.
  • To place upon a tree; to fit with a tree; to stretch upon a tree.
  • to tree a boot

    Statistics

    *

    Anagrams

    * * 1000 English basic words ----

    bark

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) barken, berken, borken, from (etyl) .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To make a short, loud, explosive noise with the vocal organs (said of animals, especially dogs).
  • The neighbour's dog is always barking .
    The seal barked as the zookeeper threw fish into its enclosure.
  • To make a clamor; to make importunate outcries.
  • * (rfdate), Tyndale.
  • They bark , and say the Scripture maketh heretics.
  • * (rfdate), Fuller
  • Where there is the barking of the belly, there no other commands will be heard, much less obeyed. .
  • To speak sharply.
  • The sergeant barked an order.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2011
  • , date=January 5 , author=Mark Ashenden , title=Wolverhampton 1 - 0 Chelsea , work=BBC citation , page= , passage=While McCarthy prowled the touchline barking orders, his opposite number watched on motionless and expressionless and, with 25 minutes to go, decided to throw on Nicolas Anelka for Kalou.}}
    Usage notes
    Historically, bork'' existed as a past tense form and ''borken as a past participle, but both forms are now obsolete.
    Derived terms
    * bark up the wrong tree * barking * barking dogs never bite * bebark * dogs bark *
    Synonyms
    * latrate (obsolete)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The short, loud, explosive sound uttered by a dog.
  • A similar sound made by some other animals.
  • (figuratively) An abrupt loud vocal utterance.
  • * circa 1921 , The Cambridge History of English and American Literature , vol 11:
  • Fox’s clumsy figure, negligently dressed in blue and buff, seemed unprepossessing; only his shaggy eyebrows added to the expression of his face; his voice would rise to a bark in excitement.

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) bark, from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (wikipedia bark)
  • (countable, uncountable) The exterior covering of the trunk and branches of a tree.
  • * '>citation
  • Moving about 70 miles per hour, it crashed through the sturdy old-growth trees, snapping their limbs and shredding bark from their trunks.
  • (medicine) Peruvian bark or Jesuit's bark, the bark of the cinchona from which quinine is produced.
  • The crust formed on barbecued meat that has had a rub applied to it.
  • * 2009 , Julie Reinhardt, She-Smoke: A Backyard Barbecue Book , page 151:
  • This softens the meat further, but at some loss of crunch to the bark .
    Usage notes
    Usually uncountable; bark may be countable when referring to the barks of different types of tree.
    Synonyms
    * (exterior covering of a tree) rind

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To strip the bark from; to peel.
  • To abrade or rub off any outer covering from.
  • to bark one’s heel
  • To girdle.
  • To cover or inclose with bark, or as with bark.
  • bark the roof of a hut

    Etymology 3

    From (etyl) , from Egyptian b?re .

    Alternative forms

    * barque

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) A small sailing vessel, e.g. a pinnace or a fishing smack; a rowing boat or barge.
  • (poetic) a sailing vessel or boat of any kind.
  • * circa 1609 , William Shakespeare, Sonnet 116:
  • It is the star to every wandering bark
  • * circa 1880 , among the Poems of Emily Dickinson:
  • Whether my bark went down at sea, Whether she met with gales,
  • (nautical) A three-masted vessel, having her foremast and mainmast square-rigged, and her mizzenmast schooner-rigged.