Rayed vs Trayed - What's the difference?

rayed | trayed |


As verbs the difference between rayed and trayed

is that rayed is (ray) while trayed is (tray).

rayed

English

Verb

(head)
  • (ray)
  • Anagrams

    * * *

    ray

    English

    Etymology 1

    Via (etyl), from (etyl) rai, from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A beam of light or radiation.
  • I saw a ray of light through the clouds.
  • (zoology) A rib-like reinforcement of bone or cartilage in a fish's fin.
  • (zoology) One of the spheromeres of a radiate, especially one of the arms of a starfish or an ophiuran.
  • (botany) A radiating part of a flower or plant; the marginal florets of a compound flower, such as an aster or a sunflower; one of the pedicels of an umbel or other circular flower cluster; radius.
  • (obsolete) Sight; perception; vision; from an old theory of vision, that sight was something which proceeded from the eye to the object seen.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • All eyes direct their rays / On him, and crowds turn coxcombs as they gaze.
  • (mathematics) A line extending indefinitely in one direction from a point.
  • (colloquial) A tiny amount.
  • Unfortunately he didn't have a ray of hope .
    Derived terms
    * death ray * gamma ray * manta ray * ray gun * stingray * X-ray

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To emit something as if in rays.
  • To radiate as if in rays
  • (Elizabeth Barrett Browning)

    Etymology 2

    (etyl) (m), from (etyl) (m).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A marine fish with a flat body, large wing-like fins, and a whip-like tail.
  • Etymology 3

    Shortened from array.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (obsolete) To arrange.
  • (obsolete) To stain or soil; to defile.
  • * 1596 , (Edmund Spenser), The Faerie Queene , VI.4:
  • From his soft eyes the teares he wypt away, / And form his face the filth that did it ray .

    Etymology 4

    From its sound, by analogy with the letters chay, jay, gay, kay, which it resembles graphically.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The name of the letter ?/?, one of two which represent the r sound in Pitman shorthand.
  • Etymology 5

    Noun

    (-)
  • (obsolete) Array; order; arrangement; dress.
  • * Spenser
  • And spoiling all her gears and goodly ray .

    Etymology 6

    Alternative forms.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (music)
  • trayed

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (tray)

  • tray

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) traye, treie, from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) Trouble; annoyance; anger.
  • Derived terms
    * (l)

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) trayen, treien, from (etyl) .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (obsolete) To grieve; annoy.
  • Etymology 3

    From (etyl) treye, from (etyl) . More at (l).

    Noun

    (wikipedia tray) (en noun)
  • A small, typically rectangular or round, flat, rigid object upon which things are carried.
  • * {{quote-book, year=1963, author=(Margery Allingham)
  • , title=(The China Governess) , chapter=2 citation , passage=Now that she had rested and had fed from the luncheon tray Mrs. Broome had just removed, she had reverted to her normal gaiety.  She looked cool in a grey tailored cotton dress with a terracotta scarf and shoes and her hair a black silk helmet.}}
  • A flat carrier for items being transported.
  • The items on a full tray.
  • A component of a device into which an item is placed for use in the device's operations.
  • (computing, graphical user interface, informal)  A notification area used for icons and alerts.
  • * 2007 , Brian Livingston, Paul Thurrott, Windows Vista Secrets
  • some developers try to use it that way for some reason (some applications inexplicably minimize to the tray rather than to the taskbar as they should).
    Derived terms
    * in-tray * meat tray * out-tray * tray-table * TV tray

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To place items on a tray.
  • Be sure to tray eggs with the large end up.
  • To slide down a snow-covered hill on a tray from a cafeteria.
  • Traying has provided collegiate fun and the occasional fatality for decades.

    Etymology 4

    From (etyl) trayen, from (etyl) . More at (l).

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (obsolete) To betray.
  • Anagrams

    *