Prayed vs Trayed - What's the difference?

prayed | trayed |


As verbs the difference between prayed and trayed

is that prayed is (pray) while trayed is (tray).

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

prayed

English

Verb

(head)
  • (pray)
  • Anagrams

    *

    pray

    English

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To petition or solicit help from a supernatural or higher being.
  • Muslims pray in the direction of Mecca.
  • To humbly beg a person for aid or their time.
  • (religion) to communicate with God for any reason.
  • (obsolete) To ask earnestly for; to seek to obtain by supplication; to entreat for.
  • * Shakespeare
  • I know not how to pray your patience.

    Derived terms

    * prayer * pray in aid

    Adverb

    (-)
  • please; used to make a polite request.
  • pray silence for…
  • * 1816 , (Jane Austen), , Volume 1 Chapter 8
  • "Pray , Mr. Knightley," said Emma, who had been smiling to herself through a great part of this speech, "how do you know that Mr. Martin did not speak yesterday?"
  • * Charles Dickens, , 1841:
  • Pray''' don’t ask me why, '''pray''' don’t be sorry, '''pray don’t be vexed with me!
  • * Frederick Marryat, , 1845:
  • Well, Major, pray tell us your adventures, for you have frightened us dreadfully.
  • * 1892 , (Arthur Conan Doyle),
  • Thank you. I am sorry to have interrupted you. Pray continue your most interesting statement.
  • * 2013 , Martina Hyde, Is the pope Catholic?'' (in ''The Guardian , 20 September 2013)[http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/sep/20/is-pope-catholic-atheists-gay-people-abortion]
  • He is a South American, so perhaps revolutionary spirit courses through Francis's veins. But what, pray , does the Catholic church want with doubt?

    trayed

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (tray)

  • tray

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) traye, treie, from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) Trouble; annoyance; anger.
  • Derived terms
    * (l)

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) trayen, treien, from (etyl) .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (obsolete) To grieve; annoy.
  • Etymology 3

    From (etyl) treye, from (etyl) . More at (l).

    Noun

    (wikipedia tray) (en noun)
  • A small, typically rectangular or round, flat, rigid object upon which things are carried.
  • * {{quote-book, year=1963, author=(Margery Allingham)
  • , title=(The China Governess) , chapter=2 citation , passage=Now that she had rested and had fed from the luncheon tray Mrs. Broome had just removed, she had reverted to her normal gaiety.  She looked cool in a grey tailored cotton dress with a terracotta scarf and shoes and her hair a black silk helmet.}}
  • A flat carrier for items being transported.
  • The items on a full tray.
  • A component of a device into which an item is placed for use in the device's operations.
  • (computing, graphical user interface, informal)  A notification area used for icons and alerts.
  • * 2007 , Brian Livingston, Paul Thurrott, Windows Vista Secrets
  • some developers try to use it that way for some reason (some applications inexplicably minimize to the tray rather than to the taskbar as they should).
    Derived terms
    * in-tray * meat tray * out-tray * tray-table * TV tray

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To place items on a tray.
  • Be sure to tray eggs with the large end up.
  • To slide down a snow-covered hill on a tray from a cafeteria.
  • Traying has provided collegiate fun and the occasional fatality for decades.

    Etymology 4

    From (etyl) trayen, from (etyl) . More at (l).

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (obsolete) To betray.
  • Anagrams

    *