Traverse vs Walk - What's the difference?

traverse | walk |


As nouns the difference between traverse and walk

is that traverse is (climbing) a route used in mountaineering, specifically rock climbing, in which the descent occurs by a different route than the ascent while walk is a trip made by walking.

As verbs the difference between traverse and walk

is that traverse is to travel across, often under difficult conditions while walk is to move on the feet by alternately setting each foot (or pair or group of feet, in the case of animals with four or more feet) forward, with at least one foot on the ground at all times compare run .

As a adverb traverse

is athwart; across; crosswise.

As a adjective traverse

is lying across; being in a direction across something else.

traverse

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • (climbing) A route used in mountaineering, specifically rock climbing, in which the descent occurs by a different route than the ascent.
  • (military) In fortification, a mass of earth or other material employed to protect troops against enfilade. It is constructed at right angles to the parapet.
  • (surveying) A series of points, with angles and distances measured between, traveled around a subject, usually for use as "control" i.e. angular reference system for later surveying work.
  • (obsolete) A screen or partition.
  • * 1499 , (John Skelton), The Bowge of Court :
  • Than sholde ye see there pressynge in a pace / Of one and other that wolde this lady see, / Whiche sat behynde a traves of sylke fyne, / Of golde of tessew the fynest that myghte be
  • * F. Beaumont
  • At the entrance of the king, / The first traverse was drawn.
  • Something that thwarts or obstructs.
  • He would have succeeded, had it not been for unlucky traverses not under his control.
  • A trick; a subterfuge.
  • (architecture) A gallery or loft of communication from side to side of a church or other large building.
  • (Gwilt)
  • (legal) A formal denial of some matter of fact alleged by the opposite party in any stage of the pleadings. The technical words introducing a traverse are absque hoc ("without this", i.e. without what follows).
  • (nautical) The zigzag course or courses made by a ship in passing from one place to another; a compound course.
  • (geometry) A line lying across a figure or other lines; a transversal.
  • (firearms) The turning of a gun so as to make it point in any desired direction.
  • Verb

  • To travel across, often under difficult conditions.
  • He will have to traverse the mountain to get to the other side.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • what seas you traversed , and what fields you fought
  • (computing) To visit all parts of; to explore thoroughly.
  • to traverse all nodes in a network
  • (artillery) To rotate a gun around a vertical axis to bear upon a military target.
  • to traverse a cannon
  • (climbing) To climb or descend a steep hill at a wide angle.
  • To lay in a cross direction; to cross.
  • * Dryden
  • The parts should be often traversed , or crossed, by the flowing of the folds.
  • To cross by way of opposition; to thwart with obstacles; to obstruct.
  • * Sir Walter Scott
  • I cannot but admit the force of this reasoning, which I yet hope to traverse .
  • To pass over and view; to survey carefully.
  • * South
  • My purpose is to traverse the nature, principles, and properties of this detestable vice — ingratitude.
  • (carpentry) To plane in a direction across the grain of the wood.
  • to traverse a board
  • (legal) To deny formally.
  • * Dryden
  • And save the expense of long litigious laws, / Where suits are traversed , and so little won / That he who conquers is but last undone.

    Adverb

    (en adverb)
  • athwart; across; crosswise
  • Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • Lying across; being in a direction across something else.
  • paths cut with traverse trenches
  • * Sir H. Wotton
  • Oak being strong in all positions, may be better trusted in cross and traverse work.
  • * Hayward
  • the ridges of the fallow field traverse

    Derived terms

    * traverse drill

    Anagrams

    * ----

    walk

    English

    (walk)

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (lb) To move on the feet by alternately setting each foot (or pair or group of feet, in the case of animals with four or more feet) forward, with at least one foot on the ground at all times. Compare .
  • :
  • *
  • *:Athelstan Arundel walked home all the way, foaming and raging.His mother lived at Pembridge Square, which is four good measured miles from Lincoln's Inn. He walked the whole way, walking through crowds, and under the noses of dray-horses, carriage-horses, and cart-horses, without taking the least notice of them.
  • *, chapter=15
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=Edward Churchill still attended to his work in a hopeless mechanical manner like a sleep-walker who walks safely on a well-known round. But his Roman collar galled him, his cossack stifled him, his biretta was as uncomfortable as a merry-andrew's cap and bells.}}
  • To "walk free", i.e. to win, or avoid, a criminal court case, particularly when actually guilty.
  • :
  • Of an object, to be stolen.
  • :
  • To walk off the field, as if given out, after the fielding side appeals and before the umpire has ruled; done as a matter of sportsmanship when the batsman believes he is out.
  • (lb) To travel (a distance) by walking.
  • :
  • *
  • *:Athelstan Arundel walked' home all the way, foaming and raging.His mother lived at Pembridge Square, which is four good measured miles from Lincoln's Inn. He ' walked the whole way, walking through crowds, and under the noses of dray-horses, carriage-horses, and cart-horses, without taking the least notice of them.
  • (lb) To take for a walk or accompany on a walk.
  • :
  • *(William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • *:I will rather trusta thief to walk my ambling gelding.
  • To allow a batter to reach base by pitching four balls.
  • (lb) To move something by shifting between two positions, as if it were walking.
  • :
  • (lb) To full; to beat cloth to give it the consistency of felt.
  • (lb) To traverse by walking (or analogous gradual movement).
  • :
  • To leave, resign.
  • :
  • *(Edmund Spenser) (c.1552–1599)
  • *:He will make their cows and garrans to walk .
  • (lb) To push (a vehicle) alongside oneself as one walks.
  • *1994 , John Forester, Bicycle Transportation: A Handbook for Cycling Transportation Engineers , MIT Press, p.245:
  • *:The county had a successful defense only because the judge kept telling the jury at every chance that the cyclist should have walked his bicycle like a pedestrian.
  • To behave; to pursue a course of life; to conduct oneself.
  • *(Jeremy Taylor) (1613–1677)
  • *:We walk' perversely with God, and he will ' walk crookedly toward us.
  • To be stirring; to be abroad; to go restlessly about; said of things or persons expected to remain quiet, such as a sleeping person, or the spirit of a dead person.
  • *(Hugh Latimer) (c.1485-1555)
  • *:I heard a pen walking in the chimney behind the cloth.
  • (lb) To be in motion; to act; to move.
  • *(Edmund Spenser) (c.1552–1599)
  • *:Her tongue did walk in foul reproach.
  • *(William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • *:I have heard, but not believed, the spirits of the dead / May walk again.
  • *(Ben Jonson) (1572-1637)
  • *:Do you think I'd walk in any plot?
  • Conjugation

    (en-conj-simple)

    Synonyms

    * (move upon two feet) - See also * be acquitted, get off, go free * (be stolen) be/get stolen; (British) be/get nicked, be/get pinched * (beat cloth) full, waulk (obsolete)

    Derived terms

    * walkathon * walker * Walker * walkies * walk away from * walk away with * walk in * walk in circles * walk into * walk it * walk it off * walk like an Egyptian * walk off * walk off with * walk on * walk on the wild side * walk out * walk over * walk through * walkie-talkie * walkman * Walkman * walkover * walk tall * walk the beat * walk the walk

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A trip made by walking.
  • I take a walk every morning
  • A distance walked.
  • It’s a long walk from my house to the library
  • (sports) An Olympic Games track event requiring that the heel of the leading foot touch the ground before the toe of the trailing foot leaves the ground.
  • A manner of walking; a person's style of walking.
  • The Ministry of Silly Walks is underfunded this year
  • A path, sidewalk/pavement or other maintained place on which to walk. Compare trail .
  • (baseball) An award of first base to a batter following four balls being thrown by the pitcher; known in the rules as a "base on balls".
  • The pitcher now has two walks in this inning alone

    Synonyms

    * (trip made by walking) stroll (slow walk), hike (long walk), trek (long walk) * (distance walked) hike (if long), trek (if long) * (manner of walking) gait * (path) footpath, path, (British) pavement, (US) sidewalk

    Derived terms

    * cakewalk * catwalk * farmer's walk * intentional walk * perp walk * race walk * random walk * sidewalk * space walk / spacewalk * sponsored walk * walk in the park * walk in the snow * walk on the wild side * walk policy * whistle walk