Retreat vs Travel - What's the difference?

retreat | travel |


As nouns the difference between retreat and travel

is that retreat is the act of pulling back or withdrawing, as from something dangerous, or unpleasant while travel is the act of traveling.

As verbs the difference between retreat and travel

is that retreat is to withdraw military forces while travel is to be on a journey, often for pleasure or business and with luggage; to go from one place to another.

retreat

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • The act of pulling back or withdrawing, as from something dangerous, or unpleasant.
  • * Shakespeare
  • In a retreat he outruns any lackey.
  • The act of reversing direction and receding from a forward position.
  • A peaceful, quiet place affording privacy or security.
  • * L'Estrange
  • He built his son a house of pleasure, and spared no cost to make a delicious retreat .
  • * Dryden
  • That pleasing shade they sought, a soft retreat / From sudden April showers, a shelter from the heat.
  • A period of retirement, seclusion, or solitude.
  • A period of meditation, prayer or study.
  • Withdrawal by military force from a dangerous position or from enemy attack.
  • A signal for a military withdrawal.
  • A bugle call or drumbeat signaling the lowering of the flag at sunset, as on a military base.
  • A military ceremony to lower the flag.
  • (chess) The move of a piece from a threatened position.
  • See also

    * religious retreat

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To withdraw military forces.
  • Anagrams

    * *

    travel

    English

    Alternative forms

    * travell

    Verb

  • To be on a journey, often for pleasure or business and with luggage; to go from one place to another.
  • I like to travel .
  • To pass from here to there; to move or transmit; to go from one place to another.
  • Soundwaves can travel through water.
  • (basketball) To move illegally by walking or running without dribbling the ball.
  • To travel throughout (a place).
  • I’ve travelled the world.
  • To force to journey.
  • * Spenser
  • They shall not be travelled forth of their own franchises.
  • (obsolete) To labour; to travail.
  • (Hooker)

    Synonyms

    * fare, journey

    Derived terms

    * (l), (l)

    Noun

  • The act of traveling.
  • space travel
    travel to Spain
  • (p) A series of journeys.
  • (p) An account of one's travels.
  • I’m off on my travels around France again.
  • The activity or traffic along a route or through a given point.
  • The working motion of a piece of machinery; the length of a mechanical stroke.
  • There was a lot of travel in the handle, because the tool was out of adjustment.
    My drill press has a travel of only 1.5 inches.
  • (obsolete) Labour; parturition; travail.
  • Synonyms

    * (act of travelling) journey, passage, tour, trip * (activity or traffic along a route or through a given point) traffic * (working motion of a piece of machinery) stroke, movement, progression

    Derived terms

    * travel bug * active travel

    References

    * *