Transitory vs Pang - What's the difference?

transitory | pang |


As a adjective transitory

is lasting only a short time; temporary.

As a noun pang is

(often|pluralized) paroxysm of extreme physical pain or anguish; sudden and transitory agony;throe.

As a verb pang is

to torment; to torture; to cause to have great pain or suffering.

transitory

English

Adjective

(en adjective)
  • Lasting only a short time; temporary.
  • * 1704 , , Section I - The Introduction,
  • Secondly, that the materials being very transitory , have suffered much from inclemencies of air, especially in these north-west regions.
  • * 1839 , , Chapter 38,
  • Quite unconscious of the demonstrations of their amorous neighbour, or their effects upon the susceptible bosom of her mama, Kate Nickleby had, by this time, begun to enjoy a settled feeling of tranquillity and happiness, to which, even in occasional and transitory glimpses, she had long been a stranger.
  • * 1922 , , Book Three, Chapter II: A Matter of Aesthetics,
  • For a moment she paused by the taxi-stand and watched them--wondering that but a few years before she had been of their number, ever setting out for a radiant Somewhere, always just about to have that ultimate passionate adventure for which the girls' cloaks were delicate and beautifully furred, for which their cheeks were painted and their hearts higher than the transitory dome of pleasure that would engulf them, coiffure, cloak, and all.
  • (legal, of an action) That may be brought in any county; opposed to local .
  • (Blackstone)
    (Bouvier)

    Synonyms

    * See also

    pang

    English

    (Webster 1913)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (often, pluralized) paroxysm of extreme physical pain or anguish; sudden and transitory agony; throe
  • * 1591 , , Henry VI, Part II , act 3, sc. 3,
  • See, how the pangs of death do make him grin!
  • * 1888 , , "The Nightingale and the Rose" in The Happy Prince and Other Tales ,
  • So the Nightingale pressed closer against the thorn, and the thorn touched her heart, and a fierce pang of pain shot through her.
  • (often, pluralized) A sharp, sudden feeling of a mental or emotional nature, as of joy or sorrow
  • * 1867 , , The Guardian Angel , ch. 7,
  • He was startled with a piece of information which gave him such an exquisite pang of delight that he could hardly keep the usual quiet of his demeanor.

    Verb

  • to torment; to torture; to cause to have great pain or suffering
  • * 1918 , , "On Unanswering Letters" in Mince Pie ,
  • It panged him so to say good-bye when he had to leave.