Tryed vs Toyed - What's the difference?

tryed | toyed |


As verbs the difference between tryed and toyed

is that tryed is ; (try) while toyed is (toy).

tryed

English

Verb

(head)
  • ; (try)
  • Anagrams

    *

    try

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) . Replaced native (etyl) (from (etyl) (m)).

    Verb

    (en-verb)
  • To attempt; to endeavour. Followed by infinitive.
  • * , chapter=22
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=Not unnaturally, “Auntie” took this communication in bad part. Thus outraged, she showed herself to be a bold as well as a furious virago. Next day she found her way to their lodgings and tried to recover her ward by the hair of the head.}}
  • *{{quote-magazine, date=2014-06-21, volume=411, issue=8892, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Magician’s brain , passage=[Isaac Newton] was obsessed with alchemy. He spent hours copying alchemical recipes and trying to replicate them in his laboratory. He believed that the Bible contained numerological codes.}}
  • (label) To divide; to separate.
  • # To separate (precious metal etc.) from the ore by melting; to purify, refine.
  • #* 1590 , (Edmund Spenser), (The Faerie Queene) , II.vii:
  • euery feend his busie paines applide, / To melt the golden metall, ready to be tride .
  • # (label) To winnow; to sift; to pick out; frequently followed by out .
  • To test, to work out.
  • # To make an experiment. Usually followed by a present participle.
  • # To put to test.
  • #*
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=4 , passage=The Celebrity, by arts unknown, induced Mrs. Judge Short and two other ladies to call at Mohair on an afternoon when Mr. Cooke was trying a trotter on the track. The three returned wondering and charmed with Mrs. Cooke; they were sure she had had no hand in the furnishing of that atrocious house.}}
  • #* 1922 , , Miss Mapp , :
  • “So mousie shall only find tins on the floor now,” thought Miss Mapp. “Mousie shall try his teeth on tins.”
  • #* {{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=May-June, author= David Van Tassel], [http://www.americanscientist.org/authors/detail/lee-dehaan Lee DeHaan
  • , title= Wild Plants to the Rescue , volume=101, issue=3, magazine=(American Scientist) , passage=Plant breeding is always a numbers game.
  • # To taste, sample, etc.
  • # To prove by experiment; to apply a test to, for the purpose of determining the quality; to examine; to prove; to test.
  • #* (William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • Let the end try the man.
  • # To put on trial.
  • #* 1900 , , (The House Behind the Cedars) , Chapter I
  • The murderer, he recalled, had been tried and sentenced to imprisonment for life, but was pardoned by a merciful governor after serving a year of his sentence.
  • To experiment, to strive.
  • # To have or gain knowledge of by experience.
  • #* (John Dryden) (1631-1700)
  • Try the Libyan heat or Scythian cold.
  • (Milton)
  • # To work on something.
  • # (label) To do; to fare.
  • # To settle; to decide; to determine; specifically, to decide by an appeal to arms.
  • #* (William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • Left I the court, to see this quarrel tried .
  • (label) To lie to in heavy weather under just sufficient sail to head into the wind.
  • To strain; to subject to excessive tests.
  • Usage notes
    * (to attempt) This is a catenative verb that takes the to'' infinitive. In the future tense, it can take ''and'' instead of ''to . *: * (to make an experiment) This is a catenative verb that takes the gerund (-ing) . * See
    Synonyms
    * (to attempt) attempt, mint, take a run at, take a stab at * sample, taste
    Derived terms
    * try-hard * try-miter square * try-off * try on * try-on * try out * try-out * try-outs * try square/try-square * try your luck * trying * try one's hand

    Noun

    (tries)
  • An attempt.
  • I gave unicycling a try but I couldn’t do it .
  • An act of tasting or sampling.
  • I gave sushi a try but I didn’t like it .
  • (rugby) A score in rugby, analogous to a touchdown in American football.
  • Today I scored my first try .
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=October 1 , author=Tom Fordyce , title=Rugby World Cup 2011: England 16-12 Scotland , work=BBC Sport citation , page= , passage=But two penalties and a drop-goal from Jonny Wilkinson, despite a host of other wayward attempts, plus a late try from Chris Ashton were enough to send a misfiring England through.}}
  • (UK, dialect, obsolete) A screen, or sieve, for grain.
  • (Holland)
  • (American football) a field goal or extra point
  • Synonyms
    * (an attempt) bash, go, stab, whirl * (an act of tasting or sampling) sampling, taste, tasting * (a score in rugby) touchdown (American football )
    Derived terms
    * give a try * old college try * penalty try * worth a try

    Etymology 2

    Probably from (etyl) .

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • (obsolete) Fine, excellent.
  • * 1596 , (Edmund Spenser), The Faerie Queene , V.2:
  • But he her suppliant hands, those hands of gold, / And eke her feete, those feete of silver trye , […] Chopt off […].

    Statistics

    *

    toyed

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (toy)

  • toy

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Something to play with, especially as intended for use by a child.
  • A thing of little importance or value; a trifle.
  • * Abr. Abbot
  • They exchange for knives, glasses, and such toys , great abundance of gold and pearl.
  • A simple, light piece of music, written especially for the virginal.
  • (obsolete) Love play, amorous dalliance; fondling.
  • * 1590 , Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene , I.i:
  • Then seemed him his Lady by him lay, / And to him playnd, how that false winged boy, / Her chast hart had subdewd, to learne Dame pleasures toy .
  • (obsolete) A vague fancy, a ridiculous idea or notion; a whim.
  • *, vol.1, III.i.2:
  • Though they do talk with you, and seem to be otherwise employed, and to your thinking very intent and busy, still that toy runs in their mind, that fear, that suspicion, that abuse, that jealousy […].
  • * Spenser
  • To fly about playing their wanton toys .
  • * Beaumont and Fletcher
  • What if a toy take 'em in the heels now, and they all run away.
  • * Drayton
  • Nor light and idle toys my lines may vainly swell.
  • (slang, derogatory) An inferior graffiti artist.
  • * 2009 , Gregory J. Snyder, Graffiti Lives: Beyond the Tag in New York's Urban Underground (page 40)
  • It is incorrect to say that toys tag and masters piece; toys just do bad tags, bad throw-ups, and bad pieces.
  • * 2011 , Adam Melnyk, Visual Orgasm: The Early Years of Canadian Graffiti (page 45)
  • I was a toy until I met Sear, who moved here from Toronto and showed me the book Subway Art.
  • (obsolete) An old story; a silly tale.
  • (Shakespeare)
  • (Scotland, archaic) A headdress of linen or wool that hangs down over the shoulders, worn by old women of the lower classes; called also toy mutch.
  • * Sir Walter Scott
  • Having, moreover, put on her clean toy , rokelay, and scarlet plaid.

    Synonyms

    * See also

    Derived terms

    * boy toy * chew toy * cuddly toy * sex toy * toylike * toyshop

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To play (with).
  • to toy with a piece of food on one's plate
    Figo is toying with the English defence.
  • To ponder or consider.
  • I have been toying with the idea of starting my own business.
  • (slang) To stimulate with a sex toy.
  • * 2013 , Jonathan Everest, Lady Loverly's Chattel
  • He could see her hand go to her slit, and soon she was toying herself along, breathing heavily.

    See also

    * game ----