Supplement vs Tonic - What's the difference?

supplement | tonic |


As nouns the difference between supplement and tonic

is that supplement is supplement while tonic is a substance with medicinal properties intended to restore or invigorate or tonic can be (music) the first note of a scale.

As an adjective tonic is

(physics|pathology) pertaining to tension, especially of muscles or tonic can be (music) pertaining to the keynote of a composition.

supplement

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • Something added, especially to make up for a deficiency.
  • *{{quote-magazine, date=2013-03, author=David S. Senchina, volume=101, issue=2, page=134
  • , magazine= , title= Athletics and Herbal Supplements , passage=Athletes' use of herbal supplements has skyrocketed in the past two decades. At the top of the list of popular herbs are echinacea and ginseng, whereas garlic, St. John's wort, soybean, ephedra and others are also surging in popularity or have been historically prevalent.}}
  • An extension to a document or publication that adds information, corrects errors or brings up to date.
  • An additional section of a newspaper devoted to a specific subject.
  • *
  • *:"Mid-Lent, and the Enemy grins," remarked Selwyn as he started for church with Nina and the children. Austin, knee-deep in a dozen Sunday supplements , refused to stir; poor little Eileen was now convalescent from grippe, but still unsteady on her legs; her maid had taken the grippe, and now moaned all day: "Mon dieu! Mon dieu! Che fais mourir! "
  • (lb) An angle that, when added to a given angle, makes 180°; a supplementary angle.
  • A vitamin, herbal extract or chemical compound ingested to meet dietary deficiencies or enhance muscular development.
  • Verb

  • To provide or make a supplement to something.
  • Synonyms

    * eke out

    tonic

    English

    Alternative forms

    * tonick (obsolete)

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) . 17th century writers believed health to be derived from firmly stretched muscles, thus tonic''; the extension of ''tonic medicine appeared in the late 18th century.

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • (physics, pathology) Pertaining to tension, especially of muscles.
  • * 2009 , Thomas Pynchon, Inherent Vice , Vintage 2010, p. 316:
  • Out in front and across the street, Doc noted half a dozen or so young men, not loitering or doing substances but poised and tonic , as if waiting for some standing order to take effect.
  • Restorative, curative or invigorating.
  • The arrival of the new members had a tonic effect on the team.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A substance with medicinal properties intended to restore or invigorate.
  • We used to brew a tonic from a particular kind of root.
  • Tonic water.
  • (US, Northeastern US) Any of various carbonated, non-alcoholic beverages; soda pop.
  • (figuratively) Something that revitalises or reinvigorates.
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=February 5 , author=Paul Fletcher , title=Newcastle 4 - 4 Arsenal , work=BBC citation , page= , passage=The result is the perfect tonic for Newcastle, coming at the end of a week that saw the departure of Andy Carroll to Liverpool on Monday and an injury to Shola Ameobi during Wednesday's defeat at Fulham.}}

    Etymology 2

    From .

    Adjective

    (-)
  • (music) Pertaining to the keynote of a composition.
  • Pertaining to the accent or stress in a word or in speech.
  • Of or relating to tones or sounds; specifically (phonetics, dated) being or relating to a speech sound made with tone unmixed and undimmed by obstruction, i.e. a vowel or diphthong.
  • Noun

    (en noun)
  • (music) The first note of a scale.
  • (music) The triad built on the tonic note.
  • (phonetics) A tonic element or letter; a vowel or a diphthong.
  • Anagrams

    * ontic ----