Rippled vs Tippled - What's the difference?

rippled | tippled |


As verbs the difference between rippled and tippled

is that rippled is (ripple) while tippled is (tipple).

rippled

English

Verb

(head)
  • (ripple)

  • ripple

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A moving disturbance or undulation in the surface of a liquid.
  • I dropped a small stone into the pond and watched the ripples .
  • A sound similar to that of undulating water.
  • A style of ice cream in which flavors have been coarsely blended together.
  • I enjoy fudge ripple''' ice cream, but I especially like to dig through the carton to get at the '''ripple part and eat only that.
  • (electronics) A small oscillation of an otherwise steady signal.
  • An implement, with teeth like those of a comb, for removing the seeds and seed vessels from flax, broom corn, etc.
  • Verb

  • To move like the undulating surface of a body of water; to undulate.
  • To propagate like a moving wave.
  • * 2008 , Bradley Simpson, Economists with Guns , page 65:
  • These problems were complicated by a foreign exchange crunch which rippled through the economy in 1961-1962, [...].
  • To make a sound as of water running gently over a rough bottom, or the breaking of ripples on the shore.
  • To remove the seeds from (the stalks of flax, etc.), by means of a ripple.
  • (by extension) To scratch or tear.
  • (Holland)

    Anagrams

    *

    tippled

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (tipple)

  • tipple

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • An area near the entrance of mines which is used to load and unload coal.
  • (rail transport) An apparatus for unloading railroad freight cars by tipping them; the place where this is done.
  • (slang) Any alcoholic drink.
  • Synonyms

    * (alcoholic drink) see

    Verb

    (tippl)
  • To sell alcoholic liquor by retail.
  • To drink too much alcohol.
  • To drink alcohol regularly or habitually, but not to excess.
  • * Macaulay
  • Few of those who were summoned left their homes, and those few generally found it more agreeable to tipple in alehouses than to pace the streets.
  • To put up (hay, etc.) in bundles in order to dry it.
  • Synonyms

    * (to drink regularly but not in excess) bibble

    Derived terms

    * tippler