Ting vs Tine - What's the difference?

ting | tine |


As a noun tine is

large wine barrel.

ting

English

Etymology 1

onomatopoeia

Noun

(en noun)
  • The sound of a small metallic bell
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • To make a ting sound
  • When the food was ready, the bell tinged
    See also
    * ding * ding dong * tintinnabulation

    Etymology 2

    Chinese: ?, pinyin: d?ng. (en)

    Alternative forms

    * ding

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • ancient Chinese vessel with legs and a lid.
  • The apartment in a Chinese temple where the idol is kept.
  • (Webster 1913) English onomatopoeias ----

    tine

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) tind''. Cognate with German ''Zinne .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A spike or point on an implement or tool, especially a prong of a fork or a tooth of a comb
  • A small branch, especially on an antler or horn
  • See also

    * prong * tooth * tool

    Etymology 2

    See .

    Noun

  • (obsolete) Trouble; distress; teen.
  • * Spenser
  • Cruel winter's tine .

    Etymology 3

    See tind.

    Verb

    (tin)
  • To kindle; to set on fire.
  • * Dryden
  • to tine the cloven wood
  • * Spenser
  • coals of contention and hot vengeance tin'd
  • (obsolete) To rage; to smart.
  • * Spenser
  • Ne was there slave, ne was there medicine / That mote recure their wounds; so inly they did tine .

    Etymology 4

    From (etyl) (modern (m)).

    Verb

    (tin)
  • To shut in, or enclose.
  • (Halliwell)
    (Webster 1913)

    Anagrams

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