Mood vs Tine - What's the difference?

mood | tine |


As an adjective mood

is tired.

As a noun tine is

large wine barrel.

mood

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) mood, mode, mod, from (etyl) .

Noun

(en noun)
  • A mental or emotional state, composure.
  • I'm in a sad mood since I dumped my lover.
  • A sullen mental state; a bad mood.
  • He's in a mood with me today.
  • A disposition to do something.
  • I'm not in the mood for running today.
  • (senseid) A prevalent atmosphere or feeling.
  • A good politician senses the mood of the crowd.
    Usage notes
    * Adjectives often used with "mood": good, bad.
    Synonyms
    * (mental or emotional state) composure, humor/humour, spirits, temperament * (bad mood) huff (informal), pet, temper * (disposition to do something) frame of mind
    Antonyms
    * (bad mood) good humour, good mood, good spirits
    Derived terms
    * in the mood * mood music * mood swing * moody
    See also
    * ambiance, ambience * atmosphere *Gemuetlichkeit

    Etymology 2

    Alteration of mode

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (grammar) A verb form that depends on how its containing clause relates to the speaker’s or writer’s wish, intent, or assertion about reality.
  • The most common mood in English is the indicative.
    Synonyms
    * mode * grammatical mood
    Hyponyms
    * See also
    Derived terms
    * indicative mood * conjunctive mood = subjunctive mood * imperative mood * conditional mood
    See also
    * aspect * tense

    Anagrams

    * ----

    tine

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) tind''. Cognate with German ''Zinne .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A spike or point on an implement or tool, especially a prong of a fork or a tooth of a comb
  • A small branch, especially on an antler or horn
  • See also

    * prong * tooth * tool

    Etymology 2

    See .

    Noun

  • (obsolete) Trouble; distress; teen.
  • * Spenser
  • Cruel winter's tine .

    Etymology 3

    See tind.

    Verb

    (tin)
  • To kindle; to set on fire.
  • * Dryden
  • to tine the cloven wood
  • * Spenser
  • coals of contention and hot vengeance tin'd
  • (obsolete) To rage; to smart.
  • * Spenser
  • Ne was there slave, ne was there medicine / That mote recure their wounds; so inly they did tine .

    Etymology 4

    From (etyl) (modern (m)).

    Verb

    (tin)
  • To shut in, or enclose.
  • (Halliwell)
    (Webster 1913)

    Anagrams

    * ----