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Tug vs Thug - What's the difference?

tug | thug |

In lang=en terms the difference between tug and thug

is that tug is an act of masturbation while thug is one of a band of assassins formerly active in northern India who worshipped Kali and offered their victims to her.

As nouns the difference between tug and thug

is that tug is a sudden powerful pull while thug is a criminal with an intimidating and unseemly appearance and mannerisms, who treats others violently and roughly, especially for hire.

As a verb tug

is to pull or drag with great effort.

tug

English

Verb

(tugg)
  • to pull or drag with great effort
  • The police officers tugged the drunkard out of the pub.
  • to pull hard repeatedly
  • He lost his patience trying to undo his shoe-lace, but tugging it made the knot even tighter.
  • to tow by tugboat
  • Derived terms

    * tug down * tug up

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • a sudden powerful pull
  • * Dryden
  • At the tug he falls, / Vast ruins come along, rent from the smoking walls.
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=September 24 , author=David Ornstein , title=Arsenal 3 - 0 Bolton , work=BBC Sport citation , page= , passage=But Van Persie slotted home 40 seconds after the break before David Wheater saw red for a tug on Theo Walcott.}}
  • (nautical) a tugboat
  • (obsolete) A kind of vehicle used for conveying timber and heavy articles.
  • (Halliwell)
  • A trace, or drawing strap, of a harness.
  • (mining) An iron hook of a hoisting tub, to which a tackle is affixed.
  • (slang) An act of masturbation
  • He had a quick tug to calm himself down before his date.

    Derived terms

    * tug of war

    Anagrams

    * ----

    thug

    English

    (wikipedia thug) From (etyl) . Thuggee was an Indian network of secret fraternities who were engaged in murdering and robbing travellers and known for strangling their victims, operating from the 17th century (possibly as early as 13th century) to the 19th century. During of India, many Indian words passed into common English, and in 1810 thug referred to members of these Indian gangs. The sense was adopted more generally as "ruffian, cutthroat" by 1839.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A criminal with an intimidating and unseemly appearance and mannerisms, who treats others violently and roughly, especially for hire.
  • (dated) One of a band of assassins formerly active in northern India who worshipped and offered their victims to her.
  • Synonyms

    * See also