Take vs Throw - What's the difference?

take | throw |


As nouns the difference between take and throw

is that take is a fog or mist while throw is the flight of a thrown object; as, a fast throw or throw can be pain, especially pain associated with childbirth; throe or throw can be (obsolete) a moment, time, occasion or throw can be .

As a verb throw is

to hurl; to cause an object to move rapidly through the air.

take

English

Verb

  • To get or put something into one's or someone's possession or control.
  • #To grasp with the hands.
  • #To pick up and move to oneself.
  • #:
  • #*{{quote-book, year=1963, author=(Margery Allingham), title=(The China Governess)
  • , chapter=19 citation , passage=Meanwhile Nanny Broome was recovering from her initial panic and seemed anxious to make up for any kudos she might have lost, by exerting her personality to the utmost. She took the policeman's helmet and placed it on a chair, and unfolded his tunic to shake it and fold it up again for him.}}
  • #To carry or move, especially to a particular destination.
  • #:
  • #*
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=2 , passage=Here was my chance. I took the old man aside, and two or three glasses of Old Crow launched him into reminiscence.}}
  • #To lead; to conduct.
  • #:
  • #*2002 ,
  • #*:They're taking the Hobbits to Isengard!
  • #To choose.
  • #:
  • #*(Bible), 1 (w) xiv 42
  • #*:Saul said, Cast lots between me and Jonathan my son. And Jonathan was taken .
  • #To accept.
  • #:
  • #*{{quote-magazine, date=2013-08-10, volume=408, issue=8848, magazine=(The Economist), author=Schumpeter
  • , title= Cronies and capitols , passage=Policing the relationship between government and business in a free society is difficult. Businesspeople have every right to lobby governments, and civil servants to take jobs in the private sector.}}
  • #To receive (a newspaper, magazine, etc.) regularly, as by paying the subscription.
  • #:
  • #(lb) To gain a position by force.
  • #:
  • #To ingest medicine, drugs, etc.
  • #:
  • #*
  • #*:To such men as Mr. Hellyer, who every night take much strong drink, and on no occasion whatever take any exercise, sixty is the grand climacteric. He was, a year ago, just fifty-nine. Alas! he has not even reached his grand climacteric. Already he is gone. He was cut off by pneumonia, or apoplexy, last Christmas.
  • #To capture using a photographic camera.
  • #:
  • #To observe; to gather information on.
  • #:
  • #(lb) To form a likeness of; to copy; to depict.
  • #:
  • #*(John Dryden) (1631-1700)
  • #*:Beauty alone could beauty take so right.
  • #(lb) To deliver, give (something); to entrust.
  • #*:
  • #*:for thy loue I haue lefte my countrey / And sythe ye shalle departe oute of this world / leue me somme token of yours that I may thynke on you / Ioseph said that wille I doo ful gladly / Now brynge me your sheld that I toke yow whanne ye went in to bataille ageynst kyng Tolleme
  • #*1526 , (William Tyndale), trans. Bible , (w) XXIII:
  • #*:Jesus perceaved there wylynes, and sayde: Why tempte ye me ye ypocrytes? lett me se the tribute money. And they toke hym a peny.
  • (lb) To have or change a state of mind or body.
  • #(lb) To endure or cope with.
  • #:
  • # To assume or interpret to be.
  • #:
  • #*, chapter=22
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=Not unnaturally, “Auntie” took this communication in bad part. Thus outraged, she showed herself to be a bold as well as a furious virago.}}
  • #(lb) To become.
  • #:
  • #(lb) To enroll (in a class, or a course of study).
  • #:
  • #(lb) To participate in, undergo, or experience.
  • #:
  • #(lb) To habituate to or gain competency at a task.
  • #:
  • #(lb) To perform or undertake, for example, a task.
  • #:
  • #*
  • #*:To such men as Mr. Hellyer, who every night take much strong drink, and on no occasion whatever take any exercise, sixty is the grand climacteric. He was, a year ago, just fifty-nine. Alas! he has not even reached his grand climacteric. Already he is gone. He was cut off by pneumonia, or apoplexy, last Christmas.
  • #*
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=4 , passage=No matter how early I came down, I would find him on the veranda, smoking cigarettes, or
  • #(lb) To experience or feel, for example, offence.
  • #:
  • #*, chapter=1
  • , title= Mr. Pratt's Patients, chapter=1 , passage=Thinks I to myself, “Sol, you're run off your course again. This is a rich man's summer ‘cottage’ and if you don't look out there's likely to be some nice, lively dog taking an interest in your underpinning.”}}
  • #*{{quote-book, year=1963, author=(Margery Allingham), title=(The China Governess)
  • , chapter=20 citation , passage=The story struck the depressingly familiar note with which true stories ring in the tried ears of experienced policemen.
  • #(lb) To go.
  • #*2007 , Edwin Mullins, The Popes of Avignon , Blue Bridge, 2008, p.59:
  • #*:Nicholas then took himself to Avignon where in August 1330 he formally renounced his claim to the papacy.
  • (lb) To require or limit.
  • #(lb) To support or carry without failing or breaking.
  • #:
  • #(lb) To need, require.
  • #:
  • #*{{quote-magazine, date=2013-08-31, volume=408, issue=8851, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Code blue , passage=Time was it took a war to close a financial exchange. Now all it needs is a glitch in technology. On August 26th trading on Eurex, the main German derivatives exchange, opened as usual; 20 minutes later it shut down for about an hour. Four days earlier the shares of every company listed on NASDAQ, an American stock exchange, ceased trading for three hours.}}
  • #(lb) To last or expend [an amount of time].
  • #:
  • To decide or to act.
  • #(lb) To not swing at a pitch.
  • #:
  • #(lb) To tighten (take up) a belaying rope. Often used imperatively.
  • #(lb) To catch the ball; especially for the wicket-keeper to catch the ball after the batsman has missed or edged it.
  • #To be the player who performs (a free kick, etc.).
  • #:
  • #Not to refuse or balk at; to undertake readily; to clear.
  • #:
  • (lb) To have sex with.
  • :
  • (lb) To fight or attempt to fight somebody. (See also take on.)
  • :
  • (lb) To stick, persist, thrive or remain.
  • :
  • *(Francis Bacon) (1561-1626)
  • *:When flame taketh and openeth, it giveth a noise.
  • (lb) To use.
  • :
  • (lb) To decide, react, or interact.
  • # To please; to gain reception; to succeed.
  • #*(Joseph Addison) (1672-1719)
  • #*:Each wit may praise it for his own dear sake, / And hint he writ it, if the thing should take .
  • #(lb) To consider as an instance or example.
  • #:
  • #To gain or secure the interest or affection of; to captivate; to engage; to interest; to charm.
  • #*(Bible), (w) vi.25:
  • #*:Neither let her take thee with her eyelids.
  • #*(William Wake) (1657-1737)
  • #*:Cleombroutus was so taken with this prospect, that he had no patience.
  • #*(Thomas Moore) (1779-1852)
  • #*:I know not why, but there was a something in those half-seen features, — a charm in the very shadow that hung over their imagined beauty, — which took me more than all the outshining loveliness of her companions.
  • #To bear without ill humour or resentment; to submit to; to tolerate; to endure.
  • #:
  • #To accept the word or offer of; to receive and accept.
  • #* (1674-1718)
  • #*:I take thee at thy word.
  • #To draw; to deduce; to derive.
  • #:
  • #*(John Tillotson) (1630-1694)
  • #*:The firm belief of a future judgment is the most forcible motive to a good life, because taken from this consideration of the most lasting happiness and misery.
  • #To accept, as something offered; to receive; not to refuse or reject; to admit.
  • #*(Bible), (w) xxxv.31:
  • #*:Ye shall take no satisfaction for the life of a murderer.
  • #*(Bible), v.10:
  • #*:Let not a widow be taken into the number under threescore.
  • # To understand or interpret.
  • Usage notes

    In informal speech, especially in certain sociolects, (took) is sometimes replaced by the proscribed form (taked).

    Quotations

    * 1611 — (King James Version of the Bible), 1:1 *: Forasmuch as many have taken in hand to set forth in order a declaration of those things which are most surely believed among us

    Synonyms

    * (to grasp with the hands) grab, grasp, grip * (sense, to get into one's possession) confiscate, seize * capture, conquer, seize * (to have sex with) have * get * ingest * receive * swallow

    Antonyms

    * (to accept) give * (to carry) bring * drop

    Derived terms

    * foretake * out-take * take aback * take a bath * take a bite * take a bow * take a breather * take a chance * take a chill pill * take a dive * take a dump * take a gamble * take a look * take a pew * take a picture * take a risk * take a run at * take a spill * take a spin * take a tumble * take action * take advantage * take after * take against * take along * take amiss * take apart * take around * take aside * take away * take back * take charge * take comfort * take cover * take down * take exception to * take five * take flight * take for a spin * take for granted * take form * take guard * take hold * take-home pay * take in * take it as it comes * take it away * take it easy * take it like a man * take it on the chin * take it out on * take off the table * take off * take offence * take offense * take on * take one's rest * take one's time * take oneself off * take out * take over * take part * take place * take pleasure * take pride * take someone prisoner * take round * take shape * take sides * take silk * takest * take stock * take that * take the biscuit * take the cake * take the fall * take the mick * take the mickey * take the piss * take the trouble * take through * take time * take to extremes * take to heart * take to one side * take to one's bed * take to one's heels * take to * take to the streets * take turns * take umbrage * take up for * take up with * take up * take upon * take vows * take with a pinch of salt * you can't take it with you See also'' taken''' ''and'' ' taking

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • An act of taking.
  • Something that is taken; a haul.
  • A profit, reward, bribe, illegal payoff or unethical kickback.
  • He wants half of the take if he helps with the job.
    The mayor is on the take .
  • An interpretation or view; perspective.
  • What’s your take on this issue, Fred?
  • (film) An attempt to record a scene.
  • It’s a take .
    Act seven, scene three, take two.
  • (rugby) A catch.
  • (acting) A facial gesture in response to an event.
  • I did a take when I saw the new car in the driveway.
  • (cricket) A catch of the ball, especially by the wicket-keeper.
  • (printing) The quantity or copy given to a compositor at one time.
  • Derived terms

    * double take * give and take * on the take * take two * take-or-pay

    See also

    These need to be checked and put in the section for the noun or verb senses as appropriate * bytake * intake * mistake * outtake * overtake * spit take * takings, taking * uptake

    Statistics

    *

    throw

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) (m), (m), from (etyl) .

    Verb

  • To hurl; to cause an object to move rapidly through the air.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=5 , passage=When this conversation was repeated in detail within the hearing of the young woman in question, and undoubtedly for his benefit, Mr. Trevor threw shame to the winds and scandalized the Misses Brewster then and there by proclaiming his father to have been a country storekeeper.}}
  • To eject or cause to fall off.
  • * Shakespeare
  • There the snake throws her enamelled skin.
  • To move to another position or condition; to displace.
  • * , chapter=17
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=This time was most dreadful for Lilian. Thrown on her own resources and almost penniless, she maintained herself and paid the rent of a wretched room near the hospital by working as a charwoman, sempstress, anything. In a moment she had dropped to the level of a casual labourer.}}
  • (ceramics) To make (a pot) by shaping clay as it turns on a wheel.
  • (cricket) Of a bowler, to deliver (the ball) illegally by straightening the bowling arm during delivery.
  • (computing) To send (an error) to an exception-handling mechanism in order to interrupt normal processing.
  • (sports) To intentionally lose a game.
  • * 2012 , August 1. Peter Walker and Haroon Siddique in Guardian Unlimited, Eight Olympic badminton players disqualified for 'throwing games'
  • Four pairs of women's doubles badminton players, including the Chinese top seeds, have been ejected from the Olympic tournament for trying to throw matches in an effort to secure a more favourable quarter-final draw.
  • (informal) To confuse or mislead.
  • * 1999 , Jan Blackstone-Ford, The Custody Solutions Sourcebook - Page 196
  • "Jann, why does he hate me so much?" That question threw me. I was expecting a lunatic yelling profanities.
  • (figuratively) To send desperately.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2010, date=December 28, author=Marc Vesty, work=BBC
  • , title= Stoke 0-2 Fulham , passage=Stoke threw men forward in numbers as they attempted to find a way back into the game, and Mark Schwarzer was forced into a low save from Huth's close-range effort.}}
  • To imprison.
  • * 1818 , (Mary Shelley), (Frankenstein)
  • The plot of Felix was quickly discovered, and De Lacey and Agatha were thrown into prison.
  • * 1993 , Margaret McKee, Fred Chisenhall, Beale black & blue: life and music on black America's main street - Page 30
  • The standard method of dealing with an addict was to arrest him, throw him into a cell, and leave him until the agonizing pangs of withdrawal were over.
  • To organize an event, especially a party.
  • * {{quote-news, year=1986, date=March 1, work=Evening News
  • , title= Bash Planned , passage=And now, Clevelanders hoping to bring the Rock Roll Hall of Fame to their city are throwing a bash to commemorate the 34th birthday of disc Jockey Alan Freed's "Moondog Coronation Ball".}}
  • * 1979 , Working Mother - July 1979 Page 72[http://books.google.com/books?id=SWEEAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA72&dq=%22throw+a+party%22&hl=en&ei=KGUeTbvyA426hAfw6OC3Dg&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=10&ved=0CFkQ6AEwCTgK#v=onepage&q=%22throw%20a%20party%22&f=false]
  • Should you be interested, for whatever reason, it will tell you how to throw a party for your 40-year-old husband or your 100-year-old great-grandmother. It also describes games that can be played at various kinds of parties
  • To roll (a die or dice).
  • * 1844 , Samuel Laing translating (Snorri Sturluson), Heimskringla
  • The kings came to the agreement between themselves that they would cast lots by the dice to determine who should have this property, and that he who threw the highest should have the district. The Swedish king threw two sixes, and said King Olaf need scarcely throw .
  • To cause a certain number on the die or dice to be shown after rolling it.
  • * 1844 , Samuel Laing translating (Snorri Sturluson), Heimskringla
  • The kings came to the agreement between themselves that they would cast lots by the dice to determine who should have this property, and that he who threw' the highest should have the district. The Swedish king ' threw two sixes, and said King Olaf need scarcely throw.
  • (bridge) To discard.
  • * {{quote-news, year=1990, date=January 4, work=(The Washington Times)
  • , title= Sharp coup overcomes trump split , passage=Declarer threw his queen of spades on the high diamond. He then won the last three tricks with his ace, queen and nine of hearts behind East's jack third.}}
  • (martial arts) To lift the opponent off the ground and bring him back down, especially into a position behind the thrower.
  • To subject someone to verbally.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2007, date=June 11, author=Claude Salhani, work=UPI
  • , title= Analysis: Irony of Bush's European tour , passage=In other European cities the president visited this week, people waited for his motorcade to pass to throw insults at him, requiring the police to intervene with batons, water cannons and tear gas.}}
  • (said of animals) To give birth to.
  • * 1916 , Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association: Volume 49
  • At the end of the normal gestation period the cow threw two calf mummies as large as cats.
  • (said of one's voice) To change in order to give the illusion that the voice is that of someone else.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2005, date=April 13, author=Leon Neyfakh, work=Harvard Crimson
  • , title= BOOKENDS: Will the Real Jonathan Safran Foer Please Stand Up , passage=“Then, when I throw my voice, when I speak as someone who's quite different from me, it starts to feel very authentic.”}}
  • To show sudden emotion, especially anger.
  • * 1991 , Janet L. Davies, Ellen Hastings Janosik, Mental health and psychiatric nursing: a caring approach
  • Bill runs into the kitchen and tells Dad that Erik is throwing a tantrum. He tells Bill to go back and watch his program and to ignore his brother. Fifteen minutes later, Erik is still screaming
  • * 1996 , New York Magazine Vol. 29, No. 32 - 19 Aug 1996; Entertaining Mrs Stone
  • In 1975, pregnant with the second of her three children, she threw a hissy fit to get on a trip to Boston for elected officials.
  • To project or send forth.
  • * 1900 , , (The House Behind the Cedars) , Chapter I,
  • Warwick left the undertaker's shop and retraced his steps until he had passed the lawyer's office, toward which he threw an affectionate glance.
  • To put on hastily; to spread carelessly.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • O'er his fair limbs a flowery vest he threw .
  • To twist two or more filaments of (silk, etc.) so as to form one thread; to twist together, as singles, in a direction contrary to the twist of the singles themselves; sometimes applied to the whole class of operations by which silk is prepared for the weaver.
  • (Tomlinson)
    Synonyms
    * (cause an object to move rapidly through the air) bowl, bung, buzz, cast, catapult, chuck, dash, direct, fire, fling, flip, heave, hurl, launch, lob, pitch, project, propel, send, shoot, shy, sling, toss, whang * (eject or cause to fall off) eject, throw off * (move to another position) displace, relocate * See also
    Derived terms
    * a stone's throw * overthrow * throw a bone to * throw a fit * throw away, throw-away * throw a wobbly * throwback * throw down the gauntlet * throw in the sponge * throw in the towel * throwing * throw shapes * throw the book at * throw up * throw one's weight around

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The flight of a thrown object; as, a fast throw.
  • The act of throwing something.
  • A distance travelled; displacement; as, the throw of the piston.
  • A piece of fabric used to cover a bed, sofa or other soft furnishing.
  • A single instance, occurrence, venture, or chance.
  • Football tickets are expensive at fifty bucks a throw .

    Derived terms

    * throw pillow * throw-up

    References

    * Krueger, Dennis (December 1982). "Why On Earth Do They Call It Throwing?" Studio Potter Vol. 11, Number 1.[http://www.studiopotter.org/articles/?art=art0001]

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) (m), alteration of (m), from (etyl) . More at (m).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Pain, especially pain associated with childbirth; throe.
  • (Spenser)
    (Dryden)
  • (veterinary) The act of giving birth in animals, especially in cows.
  • Etymology 3

    From (etyl), from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) A moment, time, occasion.
  • (obsolete) A period of time; a while.
  • * 1590 , Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene , III.iv:
  • Downe himselfe he layd / Vpon the grassie ground, to sleepe a throw ; / The cold earth was his couch, the hard steele his pillow.
    Synonyms
    * (l)

    Etymology 4

    Noun

    (head)