Throe vs Pang - What's the difference?

throe | pang |


As nouns the difference between throe and pang

is that throe is a pang, spasm while pang is (often|pluralized) paroxysm of extreme physical pain or anguish; sudden and transitory agony;throe.

As verbs the difference between throe and pang

is that throe is to put in agony while pang is to torment; to torture; to cause to have great pain or suffering.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

throe

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • A pang, spasm.
  • * 1819 , :
  • As if their own indignant Earth
    Which gave the sons of England birth
    Had felt their blood upon her brow,
    And shuddering with a mother's throe
    Had turned every drop of blood
    By which her face had been bedewed
    To an accent unwithstood, —
    As if her heart had cried aloud: [...]
  • A hard struggle.
  • A tool for splitting wood into shingles; a frow.
  • Synonyms

    * See also * See also

    Derived terms

    * in the throes of

    Verb

  • To put in agony.
  • * 1610 , , act 2 scene 1
  • *:SEBASTIAN:
  • Prithee, say on:
    The setting of thine eye and cheek proclaim
    A matter from thee, and a birth, indeed
    Which throes thee much to yield.
  • To struggle in extreme pain; to be in agony; to agonize.
  • Anagrams

    *

    pang

    English

    (Webster 1913)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (often, pluralized) paroxysm of extreme physical pain or anguish; sudden and transitory agony; throe
  • * 1591 , , Henry VI, Part II , act 3, sc. 3,
  • See, how the pangs of death do make him grin!
  • * 1888 , , "The Nightingale and the Rose" in The Happy Prince and Other Tales ,
  • So the Nightingale pressed closer against the thorn, and the thorn touched her heart, and a fierce pang of pain shot through her.
  • (often, pluralized) A sharp, sudden feeling of a mental or emotional nature, as of joy or sorrow
  • * 1867 , , The Guardian Angel , ch. 7,
  • He was startled with a piece of information which gave him such an exquisite pang of delight that he could hardly keep the usual quiet of his demeanor.

    Verb

  • to torment; to torture; to cause to have great pain or suffering
  • * 1918 , , "On Unanswering Letters" in Mince Pie ,
  • It panged him so to say good-bye when he had to leave.