Tricked vs Thicked - What's the difference?

tricked | thicked |


As verbs the difference between tricked and thicked

is that tricked is (trick) while thicked is (thick).

tricked

English

Verb

(head)
  • (trick)

  • trick

    English

    Adjective

    (er)
  • (slang) Stylish or cool.
  • Wow, your new sportscar is so trick .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Something designed to fool or swindle.
  • A single piece (or business) of a magician's (or any variety entertainer's) act.
  • An effective, clever or quick way of doing something.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-07-20, volume=408, issue=8845, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Welcome to the plastisphere , passage=Plastics are energy-rich substances, which is why many of them burn so readily. Any organism that could unlock and use that energy would do well in the Anthropocene. Terrestrial bacteria and fungi which can manage this trick are already familiar to experts in the field.}}
  • Mischievous or annoying behavior; a prank.
  • the tricks of boys
    (Prior)
  • (dated) A particular habit or manner; a peculiarity; a trait.
  • a trick''' of drumming with the fingers; a '''trick of frowning
  • * William Shakespeare, King Lear act IV, scene VI:
  • The trick of that voice I do well remember.
  • * William Shakespeare,King John Act I, scene I
  • He hath a trick of Cœur de Lion's face.
  • A knot, braid, or plait of hair.
  • (Ben Jonson)
  • (card games) A sequence in which each player plays a card and a winning play is determined.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • On one nice trick depends the general fate.
  • (slang) An act of prostitution. Generally used with turn .
  • (slang) A customer to a prostitute.
  • An entertaining difficult physical action.
  • A daily period of work, especially in shift-based jobs.
  • * 1885 , Order of Railway Conductors and Brakemen, The Conductor and Brakeman , page 496:
  • On third trick from 12 m. to 8 am, we have W. A. White, formerly operator at Wallula, who thus far has given general satisfaction.
  • * 1899 , New York (State), Bureau of Statistics, Deptartment of Labor, Annual Report :
  • Woodside Junction—On 8 hour basis, first trick' $60, second '''trick''' $60, third ' trick $50.
  • * 1949 , Labor arbitration reports , page 738:
  • The Union contends that Fifer was entitled to promotion to the position of Group Leader on the third trick in the Core Room Department.
  • (nautical) A sailor's spell of work at the helm, usually two hours long.
  • A toy; a trifle; a plaything.
  • (Shakespeare)

    Synonyms

    * (something designed to trick) artifice, con, gambit, ploy, rip-off, See also * (magic trick) illusion, magic trick, sleight of hand * (customer to a prostitute) john, see also * (entertaining difficult physical action) * (daily period of work) shift

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To fool; to cause to believe something untrue; to deceive.
  • You tried to trick me when you said that house was underpriced.
  • (heraldry) To draw (as opposed to blazon - to describe in words).
  • * 1600 , Hamlet , , by Shakespeare
  • The rugged Pyrrhus, he whose sable arms, / Black as his purpose, did the night resemble / When he lay couched in the ominous horse, / Hath now this dread and black complexion smear'd / With heraldry more dismal; head to foot / Now is he total gules; horridly trick'd / With blood of fathers, mothers, daughters, sons
  • * Ben Jonson
  • They forget that they are in the statutes: there they are tricked , they and their pedigrees.
  • To dress; to decorate; to adorn fantastically; often followed by up'', ''off'', or ''out .
  • * Alexander Pope
  • Trick her off in air.
  • * John Locke
  • Tricking up their children in fine clothes.
  • * Macaulay
  • They are simple, but majestic, records of the feelings of the poet; as little tricked out for the public eye as his diary would have been.

    Synonyms

    * (to fool) con, dupe, fool, gull, have, hoodwink, pull the wool over someone's eyes, rip off * (to trick out) mod * See also

    Derived terms

    * bag of tricks * cheap trick * dirty trick * do the trick * hat trick * how's tricks? * Jedi mind trick * magic trick * politricks * tricker * trickery * trickiness * tricknology * trick out * trick or treat * trick point * trick shot * trickster * tricky * turn a trick, turn tricks

    thicked

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (thick)

  • thick

    English

    Adjective

    (er)
  • Relatively great in extent from one surface to the opposite in its smallest solid dimension.
  • * {{quote-book, year=1963, author=(Margery Allingham), title=(The China Governess)
  • , chapter=17 citation , passage=The face which emerged was not reassuring. It was blunt and grey, the nose springing thick and flat from high on the frontal bone of the forehead, whilst his eyes were narrow slits of dark in a tight bandage of tissue. […].}}
  • Measuring a certain number of units in this dimension.
  • Heavy in build; thickset.
  • * 2007 , James T. Knight, Queen of the Hustle
  • As she twirled around in front of the mirror admiring how the dress showed off her thick booty, she felt like a princess in a children's storybook.
  • Densely crowded or packed.
  • * , chapter=3
  • , title= Mr. Pratt's Patients , passage=My hopes wa'n't disappointed. I never saw clams thicker than they was along them inshore flats. I filled my dreener in no time, and then it come to me that 'twouldn't be a bad idee to get a lot more, take 'em with me to Wellmouth, and peddle 'em out. Clams was fairly scarce over that side of the bay and ought to fetch a fair price.}}
  • Having a viscous consistency.
  • Abounding in number.
  • Impenetrable to sight.
  • Difficult to understand, or poorly articulated.
  • (informal) Stupid.
  • (informal) Friendly or intimate.
  • * T. Hughes
  • We have been thick ever since.
  • Deep, intense, or profound.
  • * Shakespeare
  • thick sleep

    Synonyms

    * (relatively great in extent from one surface to another) broad * (measuring a certain number of units in this dimension) * (heavy in build) chunky, solid, stocky, thickset * (densely crowded or packed) crowded, dense, packed * (having a viscous consistency) glutinous, viscous * (abounding in number) overflowing, swarming, teeming * (impenetrable to sight) dense, opaque, solid * (sense) unclear * dense, dumb (informal), stupid, thick as pigshit (taboo slang), thick as two short planks (slang) * (sense) chummy (qualifier), close, close-knit, friendly, pally (informal), intimate, tight-knit * great, extreme * See also

    Antonyms

    * (relatively great in extent from one surface to another) slim, thin * (heavy in build) slender, slight, slim, svelte, thin * (densely crowded or packed) sparse * (having a viscous consistency) free-flowing, runny * (abounding in number) * (impenetrable to sight) thin, transparent * (sense) clear, lucid * brainy (informal), intelligent, smart * (sense) unacquainted

    Derived terms

    * blood is thicker than water * thick and thin * thick as a brick * thick as a plank * thick as thieves * thick as two short planks * thicket * thickhead * thickish * thickly * thicko * thickness * thickset * thick-skinned * thick-un * thicky

    Adverb

    (er)
  • In a thick manner.
  • Snow lay thick on the ground.
  • Thickly.
  • Bread should be sliced thick to make toast.
  • Frequently; in great numbers.
  • The arrows flew thick and fast around us.

    Noun

    (-)
  • The thickest, or most active or intense, part of something.
  • It was mayhem in the thick of battle.
  • * Dryden
  • He through a little window cast his sight / Through thick of bars, that gave a scanty light.
  • A thicket.
  • * Drayton
  • gloomy thicks
  • * Spenser
  • Through the thick they heard one rudely rush.
  • A stupid person; a fool.
  • * 2014 , Joseph O'Connor, The Thrill of It All (page 100)
  • If there was doctorates in bollocksology and scratching yourself in bed, the two of you'd be professors by now. Pair of loafing, idle thicks .

    Derived terms

    * in the thick of * through thick and thin

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (archaic) To thicken.
  • The nightmare Life-in-death was she, / Who thicks man's blood with cold. — Coleridge.
    1000 English basic words