After vs The - What's the difference?

after | the |


As nouns the difference between after and the

is that after is anus while the is tea (variant of : ).

after

English

Alternative forms

* afther * aftre (obsolete)

Adverb

(-)
  • Behind; later in time; following.
  • They lived happily ever after .
    I left the room, and the dog bounded after .

    Derived terms

    * after-effect * aftermarket * aftermath * aftertaste * afterwards * go after

    Preposition

    (English prepositions)
  • Subsequently to; following in time; later than.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=1 , passage=I was about to say that I had known the Celebrity from the time he wore kilts. But I see I will have to amend that, because he was not a celebrity then, nor, indeed, did he achieve fame until some time after I left New York for the West.}}
  • * {{quote-news, year=2012, date=April 15, author=Phil McNulty, work=BBC
  • , title= Tottenham 1-5 Chelsea , passage=After early sparring, Spurs started to take control as the interval approached and twice came close to taking the lead. Terry blocked Rafael van der Vaart's header on the line and the same player saw his cross strike the post after Adebayor was unable to apply a touch.}}
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-08, volume=407, issue=8839, page=52, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= The new masters and commanders , passage=From the ground, Colombo’s port does not look like much. Those entering it are greeted by wire fences, walls dating back to colonial times and security posts. For mariners leaving the port after lonely nights on the high seas, the delights of the B52 Night Club and Stallion Pub lie a stumble away.}}
  • Behind.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=5 , passage=Then came a maid with hand-bag and shawls, and after her a tall young lady. She stood for a moment holding her skirt above the grimy steps,
  • In pursuit of, seeking.
  • In allusion to, in imitation of; following or referencing.
  • Next in importance or rank.
  • As a result of.
  • In spite of.
  • I can't believe that, after all our advice against gambling, you walked into that casino!
  • (Used to indicate recent completion of an activity)
  • *
  • *
  • * '>citation
  • *
  • *
  • (dated) According to an author or text.
  • Denoting the aim or object; concerning; in relation to.
  • to look after''' workmen; to enquire '''after''' a friend; to thirst '''after righteousness
  • (obsolete) According to the direction and influence of; in proportion to; befitting.
  • * Francis Bacon
  • He takes greatness of kingdoms according to bulk and currency, and not after their intrinsic value.

    Usage notes

    * The Irish English usage example is equivalent to "I had just finished my dinner when .".

    Derived terms

    * after one's own heart * after you * after-five * afternoon * go after * look after * name after

    Conjunction

    (English Conjunctions)
  • (Signifies that the action of the clause it starts takes place before the action of the other clause).
  • :
  • *
  • *:It is never possible to settle down to the ordinary routine of life at sea until the screw begins to revolve. There is an hour or two, after the passengers have embarked, which is disquieting and fussy.
  • *1991 , Donald "Shadow" Rimgale (character), (Robert DeNiro) (actor),
  • *:So you punched out a window for ventilation. Was that before or after you noticed you were standing in a lake of gasoline?
  • *{{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=May-June, author= David Van Tassel], [http://www.americanscientist.org/authors/detail/lee-dehaan Lee DeHaan
  • , title= Wild Plants to the Rescue , volume=101, issue=3, magazine=(American Scientist) , passage=Plant breeding is always a numbers game.

    Adjective

    (head)
  • (dated) Later; second (of two); next, following, subsequent
  • * 1834 , (w), A Narrative of the Life of , Nebraska 1987, p. 72:
  • I did verily believe in my own mind, that I couldn't fight in that way at all; but my after experience convinced me that this was all a notion.
  • * 1886 , (Thomas Hardy),
  • The amends he had made in after life were lost sight of in the dramatic glare of the original act.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=1 , passage=In the old days, […], he gave no evidences of genius whatsoever. He never read me any of his manuscripts, […], and therefore my lack of detection of his promise may in some degree be pardoned. But he had then none of the oddities and mannerisms which I hold to be inseparable from genius, and which struck my attention in after days when I came in contact with the Celebrity.}}
  • (nautical, where the frame of reference is within the ship) At or towards the stern of a ship.
  • Usage notes

    * As shown in the examples above, the adverb in this nautical usage is (aft) and the related preposition is (abaft).

    Derived terms

    *

    References

    * Andrea Tyler and Vyvyan Evans, "Spatial particles of orientation", in The Semantics of English Prepositions: Spatial Scenes, Embodied Meaning and Cognition , Cambridge University Press, 2003, 0-521-81430 8

    Statistics

    *

    the

    English

    Alternative forms

    * e (archaic): variant spelling of the . * (archaic) * da, teh, le (informal) * t' (Northern England)

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl), from (etyl) .

    Article

    (head)
  • I’m reading the''' book.'' (Compare ''I’m reading '''a book. )
    The''' street in front of your house.'' (Compare '''''A street in Paris. )
    The''' men and women watched '''the''' man give '''the''' birdseed to '''the bird.
  • Used before an object considered to be unique, or of which there is only one at a time.
  • No one knows how many galaxies there are in the universe.
    God save the Queen!
  • That apple pie was the best.
  • * 1994 , Nelson Mandela, Long Walk to Freedom , Abacus 2010, page 536:
  • Stern and God-fearing, the Afrikaner takes his religion seriously.
  • Feed the''' hungry, clothe '''the''' naked, comfort '''the''' afflicted, and afflict '''the comfortable.
  • Used to indicate a certain example of (a noun) which is most usually of concern, or most common or familiar.
  • No one in the whole country had seen it before.
    I don't think I'll get to it until the morning.
  • A stone hit him on the head. (= “A stone hit him on his head.”)
  • That is'' the ''hospital to go to for heart surgery.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2012
  • , date=May 27 , author=Nathan Rabin , title=TV: Review: THE SIMPSONS (CLASSIC): “New Kid On The Block” (season 4, episode 8; originally aired 11/12/1992) , work=The Onion AV Club , url=http://www.avclub.com/articles/new-kid-on-the-block,75341/ , page= , passage=“New Kid On The Block” doubles as a terrific showcase for the Sea Captain who, in the grand tradition of Simpsons supporting characters, quickly goes from being a stereotype to an archetype, from being a crusty sea-captain character to the crusty sea-captain character.}}
    Usage notes
    The word the precedes proper nouns in a number of cases, although most proper nouns use no article. There are always exceptions. See also for more information. ; Countries ** As a general rule, country names are not preceded by the . There are a few exceptions, most of which are pluralised: * The Netherlands * The Bahamas * The Solomon Islands * The Maldives * The Seychelles * The Philippines * The Yemen (can also be used without an article) * The Sudan (can also be used without an article) * The Ukraine (article dropped since 1991) * The Lebanon (usually used without the article) ** Names of countries containing specifications like kingdom', '''republic etc are used with ''the : * The United States * The United Kingdom * The United Arab Emirates * The Czech Republic ; Place names ** Some place names use a definite article * All oceans (The Atlantic Ocean, The Pacific Ocean) * All seas (The Red Sea, The Bering Sea, The Caribbean Sea), and straits (The Strait of Magellan, the Bering Strait, The Bosphorus) * All rivers (The Amazon, The Nile, The Mississippi, The Seine, The Yangtze), canals (The Panama Canal, The Suez Canal) and deltas (The Nile Delta, The Orinoco Delta, The Colorado River Delta) * All art galleries (The Tate, The Louvre, The Smithsonian American Art Museum), all museums with the word museum in the name (The National Museum of Natural History, The British Museums) * Most English-language newspapers (The New York Times, The Guardian, The Chronicle, The Wall Street Journal) ; Bands ** Musical bands with a plural name are generally used with the : * The Beatles * The Rolling Stones ; Universities ** University names beginning with the word "University", and some other university names, are used with the : * The University of North Carolina * The Ohio State University * When used before an adjective which is not followed by a noun, it may refer to a group of people for which the adjective is appropriate: ** the Scottish = Scots ** the rich = rich people (considered as a group)
    Derived terms
    * nevertheless * nonetheless * the heck * the hell * the man * the one

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl), from (etyl) .

    Adverb

    (-)
  • With a comparative or more and a verb phrase, establishes a parallel with one or more other such comparatives.
  • The''' hotter, '''the better.
    The''' more I think about it, '''the weaker it looks.
    The''' more money donated, '''the''' more books purchased, and '''the more happy children.
    It looks weaker and weaker, the more I think about it.
  • It was a difficult time, but I’m the wiser for it.
    It was a difficult time, and I’m none the wiser for it.
    I'm much the wiser for having had a difficult time like that.

    See also

    * a * an * (slang) da * (slang) de * t’ * that * this *

    Statistics

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