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Stupid vs Test - What's the difference?

stupid | test |

As nouns the difference between stupid and test

is that stupid is a stupid person; a fool while test is .

As an adjective stupid

is lacking in intelligence or exhibiting the quality of having been done by someone lacking in intelligence.

As an adverb stupid

is (slang|dated) extremely.

stupid

English

Adjective

(en-adj)
  • Lacking in intelligence or exhibiting the quality of having been done by someone lacking in intelligence.
  • Because it's a big stupid jellyfish!
  • To the point of stupor.
  • Neurobiology bores me stupid .
  • (archaic) Characterized by or in a state of stupor; paralysed.
  • * 1702 Alexander Pope, Sappho 128:
  • No sigh to rise, no tear had pow'r to flow, Fix'd in a stupid lethargy of woe.
  • (archaic) Lacking sensation; inanimate; destitute of consciousness; insensate.
  • * 1744 George Berkeley, Siris §190:
  • Were it not for [fire], the whole wou'd be one great stupid inanimate mass.
  • (slang) Amazing.
  • That dunk was stupid! His head was above the rim!
  • (slang) damn, annoying, darn
  • I fell over the stupid wire.

    Synonyms

    * dense, dumb, retarded, unintelligent * (especially in the Caribbean) stupidy * See also

    Derived terms

    * stupe * stupefy * stupid-ass * stupidity * stupidly * stupidness

    References

    *

    Adverb

    (en adverb)
  • (slang, dated) Extremely.
  • My gear is stupid fly.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A stupid person; a fool.
  • * 1910 , , ‘The Strategist’, Reginald in Russia :
  • ‘You stupid !’ screamed the girls, ‘we've got to guess the word.’
  • * 1922 , Elizabeth G. Young, Homestead ranch
  • "What a stupid I am!" Harry exclaimed, as she watched the man ride away in the distance.
  • * 1996 , Anita Rau Badamim, Tamarind Mem
  • At least those stupids got their money's worth out of this country before they burnt their lungs out.
    1000 English basic words ----

    test

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) ; see terra, thirst.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A cupel or cupelling hearth in which precious metals are melted for trial and refinement.
  • A , trial.
  • * {{quote-magazine, year=2012, month=March-April
  • , author=Colin Allen , title=Do I See What You See? , volume=100, issue=2, page=168 , magazine=(American Scientist) citation , passage=Numerous experimental tests and other observations have been offered in favor of animal mind reading, and although many scientists are skeptical, others assert that humans are not the only species capable of representing what others do and don’t perceive and know.}}
  • (academia) An examination, given often during the academic term.
  • A session in which a product or piece of equipment is examined under everyday or extreme conditions to evaluate its durability, etc.
  • A Test match.
  • (marine biology) The external calciferous shell, or endoskeleton, of an echinoderm, e.g. sand dollars]] and sea urchins.
  • (botany) Testa; seed coat.
  • Judgment; distinction; discrimination.
  • * Dryden
  • Who would excel, when few can make a test / Betwixt indifferent writing and the best?
    Synonyms
    * (challenge) challenge, trial * (sense) quiz, examination
    Antonyms
    * (challenge) breeze * (sense) recess
    Derived terms
    * acid test * babysitter test * blood test * flame test * inkblot test * litmus test * nose test * Rorschach test * smell test * smoke test * sniff test * stress test * test case * tester * test tube
    Descendants
    * German: (l) * Dutch: (l)

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To refine (gold, silver, etc.) in a test or cupel; to subject to cupellation.
  • To .
  • Climbing the mountain tested our stamina.
  • To put to the proof; to prove the truth, genuineness, or quality of by experiment, or by some principle or standard; to try.
  • to test''' the soundness of a principle; to '''test the validity of an argument
  • * Washington
  • Experience is the surest standard by which to test the real tendency of the existing constitution.
  • (academics) To administer or assign an examination, often given during the academic term, to (somebody).
  • To place a product or piece of equipment under everyday and/or extreme conditions and examine it for its durability, etc.
  • * {{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=May-June, author= Charles T. Ambrose
  • , title= Alzheimer’s Disease , volume=101, issue=3, page=200, magazine=(American Scientist) , passage=Similar studies of rats have employed four different intracranial resorbable, slow sustained release systems— […]. Such a slow-release device containing angiogenic factors could be placed on the pia mater covering the cerebral cortex and tested in persons with senile dementia in long term studies.}}
  • (copulative) To be shown to be by test.
  • (chemistry) To examine or try, as by the use of some reagent.
  • to test a solution by litmus paper
    Descendants
    * German: (l)

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) tester, from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) A witness.
  • * Ld. Berners
  • Prelates and great lords of England, who were for the more surety tests of that deed.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (obsolete) To make a testament, or will.