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Enter two words to compare and contrast their definitions, origins, and synonyms to better understand how those words are related.

loud

Busy vs Loud - What's the difference?

busy | loud |


As adjectives the difference between busy and loud

is that busy is crowded with business or activities; having a great deal going on while loud is of great intensity.

As a verb busy

is to make somebody busy, to keep busy with, to occupy, to make occupied.

As a noun busy

is {{cx|slang|UK|Liverpool|derogatory|lang=en}} A police officer.

As an adverb loud is

loudly.

As a proper noun Loud is

{{surname}.

Sonic vs Loud - What's the difference?

sonic | loud |


As adjectives the difference between sonic and loud

is that sonic is of or relating to sound while loud is of great intensity.

As an adverb loud is

loudly.

As a proper noun Loud is

{{surname}.

Phony vs Loud - What's the difference?

phony | loud |


As adjectives the difference between phony and loud

is that phony is fraudulent; fake; having a misleading appearance while loud is of great intensity.

As a noun phony

is a person who assumes an identity or quality other than their own.

As an adverb loud is

loudly.

As a proper noun Loud is

{{surname}.

Tough vs Loud - What's the difference?

tough | loud |


As adjectives the difference between tough and loud

is that tough is strong and resilient; sturdy while loud is of great intensity.

As an interjection tough

is Used to indicate lack of sympathy

As a noun tough

is a person who obtains things by force; a thug or bully.

As a verb tough

is to endure.

As an adverb loud is

loudly.

As a proper noun Loud is

{{surname}.

Loud vs Blustering - What's the difference?

loud | blustering | Synonyms |


As adjectives the difference between loud and blustering

is that loud is of great intensity while blustering is engaged in the process of blustering.

As an adverb loud

is loudly.

As a proper noun Loud

is {{surname}.

As a noun blustering is

the process of blustering.

As a verb blustering is

present participle of bluster.

Loud vs Up - What's the difference?

loud | up |


As adjectives the difference between loud and up

is that loud is of great intensity while up is awake.

As adverbs the difference between loud and up

is that loud is loudly while up is away from the centre of the Earth or other planet; in opposite direction to the downward pull of gravity.

As proper nouns the difference between loud and up

is that loud is {{surname} while UP is initialism of Upper Peninsula|lang=en.

As a preposition up is

toward the top of.

As a noun up is

the direction opposed to the pull of gravity.

As a verb up is

to increase or raise.

Ranting vs Loud - What's the difference?

ranting | loud |


As a verb ranting

is present participle of lang=en.

As an adjective loud is

of great intensity.

As an adverb loud is

loudly.

As a proper noun Loud is

{{surname}.

Eek vs Loud - What's the difference?

eek | loud |


As proper nouns the difference between eek and loud

is that eek is a river in Alaska while Loud is {{surname}.

As an interjection eek

is representing a scream or shriek (especially in comic strips and books).

As a verb eek

is to produce a high-pitched squeal, as in fear or trepidation.

As an adjective loud is

of great intensity.

As an adverb loud is

loudly.

Loud vs Tout - What's the difference?

loud | tout |


As an adjective loud

is of great intensity.

As an adverb loud

is loudly.

As a proper noun Loud

is {{surname}.

As a noun tout is

someone advertising for customers in an aggressive way.

As a verb tout is

to flaunt, to publicize/publicise; to boast or brag; to promote.

Large vs Loud - What's the difference?

large | loud |


As an adjective large

is of considerable or relatively great size or extent.

As a noun large

is (music|obsolete) an old musical note, equal to two longas, four breves, or eight semibreves.

As a proper noun loud is

.

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