coarse

Coarse vs Currish - What's the difference?

coarse | currish | Related terms |

Coarse is a related term of currish.


As adjectives the difference between coarse and currish

is that coarse is composed of large parts or particles; of inferior quality or appearance; not fine in material or close in texture while currish is pertaining to a cur or mongrel.

Coarse vs Large - What's the difference?

coarse | large | Synonyms |


As adjectives the difference between coarse and large

is that coarse is composed of large parts or particles; of inferior quality or appearance; not fine in material or close in texture while large is of considerable or relatively great size or extent.

As a noun large is

an old musical note, equal to two longas, four breves, or eight semibreves.

Coarse vs Tumultuous - What's the difference?

coarse | tumultuous | Related terms |

Coarse is a related term of tumultuous.


As adjectives the difference between coarse and tumultuous

is that coarse is composed of large parts or particles; of inferior quality or appearance; not fine in material or close in texture while tumultuous is noisy and disorderly.

Close vs Coarse - What's the difference?

close | coarse | Related terms |

Close is a related term of coarse.


As adjectives the difference between close and coarse

is that close is closed, shut while coarse is composed of large parts or particles; of inferior quality or appearance; not fine in material or close in texture.

As a verb close

is (label) to remove a gap.

As a noun close

is an end or conclusion or close can be an enclosed field.

Coarse vs Turbulent - What's the difference?

coarse | turbulent | Related terms |

Coarse is a related term of turbulent.


As adjectives the difference between coarse and turbulent

is that coarse is composed of large parts or particles; of inferior quality or appearance; not fine in material or close in texture while turbulent is violently disturbed or agitated; tempestuous, tumultuous.

Coarse vs Ragged - What's the difference?

coarse | ragged |


As adjectives the difference between coarse and ragged

is that coarse is composed of large parts or particles; of inferior quality or appearance; not fine in material or close in texture while ragged is rent or worn into tatters, or till the texture is broken.

As a verb ragged is

(rag).

Short vs Coarse - What's the difference?

short | coarse | Related terms |

Short is a related term of coarse.


As a proper noun short

is .

As an adjective coarse is

composed of large parts or particles; of inferior quality or appearance; not fine in material or close in texture.

Portly vs Coarse - What's the difference?

portly | coarse | Related terms |

Portly is a related term of coarse.


As adjectives the difference between portly and coarse

is that portly is somewhat fat, pudgy, overweight while coarse is composed of large parts or particles; of inferior quality or appearance; not fine in material or close in texture.

Compact vs Coarse - What's the difference?

compact | coarse | Related terms |

Compact is a related term of coarse.


As adjectives the difference between compact and coarse

is that compact is closely packed, ie packing much in a small space while coarse is composed of large parts or particles; of inferior quality or appearance; not fine in material or close in texture.

As a noun compact

is an agreement or contract or compact can be a small, slim folding case, often featuring a mirror, powder and a powderpuff; that fits into a woman's purse or handbag, or that slips into ones pocket.

As a verb compact

is to make more dense; to compress.

Coarse vs Untutored - What's the difference?

coarse | untutored | Related terms |

Coarse is a related term of untutored.


As adjectives the difference between coarse and untutored

is that coarse is composed of large parts or particles; of inferior quality or appearance; not fine in material or close in texture while untutored is untrained, not taught or educated in a field of knowledge.

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