Stage vs Term - What's the difference?

stage | term |


As nouns the difference between stage and term

is that stage is a phase while term is term.

As a verb stage

is to produce on a stage, to perform a play.

stage

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • A phase.
  • * (1800-1859)
  • Such a polity is suited only to a particular stage in the progress of society.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-28, author=(Joris Luyendijk)
  • , volume=189, issue=3, page=21, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= Our banks are out of control , passage=Seeing the British establishment struggle with the financial sector is like watching an alcoholic […].  Until 2008 there was denial over what finance had become. […]  But the scandals kept coming, and so we entered stage three – what therapists call "bargaining". A broad section of the political class now recognises the need for change but remains unable to see the necessity of a fundamental overhaul. Instead it offers fixes and patches.}}
  • The area, in any theatre, generally raised, upon which an audience watches plays or other public ceremonies.
  • * (Alexander Pope) (1688-1744)
  • Knights, squires, and steeds must enter on the stage .
  • * (1791–1875)
  • Lo! Where the stage , the poor, degraded stage, / Holds its warped mirror to a gaping age.
  • A floor or storey of a house.
  • (Wyclif)
  • A floor elevated for the convenience of mechanical work, etc.; scaffolding; staging.
  • A platform, often floating, serving as a kind of wharf.
  • A stagecoach, an enclosed horsedrawn carriage used to carry passengers.
  • * (William Cowper) (1731-1800)
  • a parcel sent you by the stage
  • * (Jonathan Swift) (1667–1745)
  • I went in the sixpenny stage .
  • (label) A place of rest on a regularly travelled road; a station; a place appointed for a relay of horses.
  • (label) A degree of advancement in a journey; one of several portions into which a road or course is marked off; the distance between two places of rest on a road.
  • * Jeffrey
  • A stage signifies a certain distance on a road.
  • * 1858 , (Samuel Smiles), (Robert Stephenson), The Life of George Stephenson: Railway Engineer , p.356
  • He travelled by gig, with his wife, his favourite horse performing the journey by easy stages .
  • *{{quote-book, year=1910, author=(Emerson Hough)
  • , title= The Purchase Price, chapter=3 , passage=The Mount Vernon , favoured by a good stage of water, soon cleared the narrow Monongahela channel, passed the confluence, and headed down under full steam, […].}}
  • (label) The number of an electronic circuit’s block, such as a filter, an amplifier, etc.
  • The place on a microscope where the slide is located for viewing.
  • (label) A level; one of the sequential areas making up the game.
  • A place where anything is publicly exhibited, or a remarkable affair occurs; the scene.
  • * (William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • When we are born, we cry that we are come / To this stage of fools.
  • * (John Milton) (1608-1674)
  • Music and ethereal mirth / Wherewith the stage of air and earth did ring.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2011, date=September 2, author=Phil McNulty, work=BBC
  • , title= Bulgaria 0-3 England , passage=Rooney's United team-mate Chris Smalling was given his debut at right-back and was able to adjust to the international stage in relatively relaxed fashion as Bulgaria barely posed a threat of any consequence.}}

    Synonyms

    * (phase) tier, level

    Derived terms

    * sage on the stage * stagecoach * stage-door Johnny * stage whisper * staging area

    Verb

    (en-verb)
  • To produce on a stage, to perform a play.
  • The local theater group will stage "Pride and Prejudice".
  • To demonstrate in a deceptive manner.
  • The salesman’s demonstration of the new cleanser was staged to make it appear highly effective.
  • (Of a protest or strike etc.) To carry out.
  • To cause to pause or wait at a designated location.
  • We staged the cars to be ready for the start, then waited for the starter to drop the flag.
    to stage data to be written at a later time

    Anagrams

    * * ----

    term

    English

    (wikipedia term)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Limitation, restriction or regulation. (rfex)
  • Any of the binding conditions or promises in a legal contract.
  • That which limits the extent of anything; limit; extremity; bound; boundary.
  • * Francis Bacon
  • Corruption is a reciprocal to generation, and they two are as nature's two terms , or boundaries.
  • (geometry) A point, line, or superficies that limits.
  • A line is the term''' of a superficies, and a superficies is the '''term of a solid.
  • A word or phrase, especially one from a specialised area of knowledge.
  • "Algorithm" is a term used in computer science.
  • Relations among people.
  • * , chapter=22
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=Not unnaturally, “Auntie” took this communication in bad part.
  • Part of a year, especially one of the three parts of an academic year.
  • (mathematics) Any value (variable or constant) or expression separated from another term by a space or an appropriate character, in an overall expression or table.
  • (logic) The subject or the predicate of a proposition; one of the three component parts of a syllogism, each one of which is used twice.
  • * Sir W. Hamilton
  • The subject and predicate of a proposition are, after Aristotle, together called its terms or extremes.
  • (architecture) A quadrangular pillar, adorned on top with the figure of a head, as of a man, woman, or satyr.
  • Duration of a set length; period in office of fixed length.
  • (computing) A terminal emulator, a program that emulates a video terminal.
  • (of a patent) The maximum period during which the patent can be maintained into force.
  • (astrology) An essential dignity in which unequal segments of every astrological sign have internal rulerships which affect the power and integrity of each planet in a natal chart.
  • (archaic) A menstrual period.
  • * 1660 , (Samuel Pepys), Diary
  • My wife, after the absence of her terms for seven weeks, gave me hopes of her being with child, but on the last day of the year she hath them again.
  • (nautical) A piece of carved work placed under each end of the taffrail.
  • Derived terms

    {{der3, at term , blanket term , collective term , come to terms , long-term , midterm , short-term , term limit , term logic , term of art , terms and conditions , umbrella term}}

    See also

    * idiom * lexeme * listeme * word

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To phrase a certain way, especially with an unusual wording.
  • *
  • * {{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=September-October, author=(Henry Petroski)
  • , magazine=(American Scientist), title= The Evolution of Eyeglasses , passage=The ability of a segment of a glass sphere to magnify whatever is placed before it was known around the year 1000, when the spherical segment was called a reading stone, essentially what today we might term a frameless magnifying glass or plain glass paperweight.}}