Trended vs Tended - What's the difference?

trended | tended |


As verbs the difference between trended and tended

is that trended is (trend) while tended is (tend).

trended

English

Verb

(head)
  • (trend)
  • Anagrams

    *

    trend

    English

    (wikipedia trend)

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) . Akin to (etyl) trinde "ball", (etyl) tryndel "circle, ring". More at (l), (l).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • An inclination in a particular direction.
  • * {{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=September-October, author= Michael Sivak
  • , magazine=(American Scientist), title= Will AC Put a Chill on the Global Energy Supply? , passage=Nevertheless, it is clear that the global energy demand for air-conditioning will grow substantially as nations become more affluent,
  • A tendency.
  • A fad or fashion style.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2012, date=June 26, author=Genevieve Koski, work=The Onion AV Club
  • , title= Music: Reviews: Justin Bieber: Believe , passage=But musical ancestry aside, the influence to which Bieber is most beholden is the current trends in pop music, which means Believe is loaded up with EDM accouterments, seeking a comfortable middle ground where Bieber’s impressively refined pop-R&B croon can rub up on techno blasts and garish dubstep drops (and occasionally grind on some AutoTune, not necessarily because it needs it, but because a certain amount of robo-voice is expected these days).}}
  • (label) A line drawn on a graph that approximates the trend of a number of disparate points.
  • (nautical) The lower end of the shank of an anchor, being the same distance on the shank from the throat that the arm measures from the throat to the bill.
  • (nautical) The angle made by the line of a vessel's keel and the direction of the anchor cable, when she is swinging at anchor.
  • Verb

  • To have a particular direction; to run; to stretch; to tend
  • The shore of the sea trends to the southwest.
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2012 , date=May 31 , author=Tasha Robinson , title=Film: Review: Snow White And The Huntsman citation , page= , passage=Huntsman starts out with a vision of Theron that’s specific, unique, and weighted in character, but it trends throughout toward generic fantasy tropes and black-and-white morality, and climaxes in a thoroughly familiar face-off. }}
  • To cause to turn; to bend.
  • * W. Browne
  • Not far beneath i' the valley as she trends / Her silver stream.
  • (Internet, intransitive, informal) To be the subject of a trend; to be currently popular, relevant or interesting.
  • What topics have been trending on social networks this week?
    Derived terms
    * betrend * trendy

    Etymology 2

    Compare (etyl) .

    Noun

    (-)
  • (UK, dialect, dated) clean wool
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • To cleanse, as wool.
  • ----

    tended

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (tend)
  • Anagrams

    * ----

    tend

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) tenden, from (etyl) . Related to (l).

    Alternative forms

    * (l), (l), (l), (l), (l) * (l), (l), (l), (l) (Scotland)

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To kindle; ignite; set on fire; light; inflame; burn.
  • Derived terms
    * (l), (l)

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) *.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (legal, Old English law) To make a tender of; to offer or tender.
  • (followed by a to infinitive) To be likely, or probable to do something, or to have a certain characteristic.
  • They tend to go out on Saturdays.
    It tends to snow here in winter.
    Usage notes
    * In sense 2. this is a catenative verb that takes the to infinitive. * See
    Derived terms
    * tendency

    See also

    * be given to

    Etymology 3

    From (etyl) . More at (l).

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (with to) To look after (e.g. an ill person.)
  • We need to tend to the garden, which has become a mess.
  • To accompany as an assistant or protector; to care for the wants of; to look after; to watch; to guard.
  • Shepherds tend their flocks.
  • * Emerson
  • There's not a sparrow or a wren, / There's not a blade of autumn grain, / Which the four seasons do not tend / And tides of life and increase lend.
  • To wait (upon), as attendants or servants; to serve; to attend.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Was he not companion with the riotous knights / That tend upon my father?
  • (obsolete) To await; to expect.
  • (Shakespeare)
  • (obsolete) To be attentive to; to note carefully; to attend to.
  • * Chapman
  • Being to descend / A ladder much in height, I did not tend / My way well down.
  • (nautical) To manage (an anchored vessel) when the tide turns, to prevent it from entangling the cable when swinging.
  • Anagrams

    * ----