Moxie vs Tenacious - What's the difference?

moxie | tenacious |


As a noun moxie

is backbone, determination and fortitude.

As an adjective tenacious is

clinging to an object or surface; adhesive.

moxie

English

Noun

(-)
  • backbone, determination and fortitude
  • initiative or skill
  • * {{quote-book
  • , year=1971 , author=(John Updike) , title=(Rabbit Redux) , page=401 , pageurl=http://books.google.com/books?id=ohnQr0ij3S8C&pg=PA401&hl=en&sa=X&ei=1zfcUPbOEILrqAHV8YDIAQ&ved=0CDwQ6AEwAA
  • v=onepage&q=moxie&f=false
  • , passage=As a girl she had speed and a knock-kneed moxie at athletics, and might have done more with it if she hadn't harvested all the glory already. }}
  • * {{quote-video
  • , date = 2011-01-29 , title = (Phineas and Ferb) , episode = : The Musical! , season = 2 , number = 38 , people = (Dan Povenmire) , role = Building Engineer , at = “Aren't You a Little Young?” (song) , passage = Yes it's true! / That you seem a little young to do the things that you do, / even with all that moxie you've got. }}

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    References

    tenacious

    English

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • clinging to an object or surface; adhesive
  • unwilling to yield or give up; dogged
  • holding together; cohesive
  • having a good memory; retentive
  • Synonyms

    * See also