Felly vs Telly - What's the difference?

felly | telly |


As nouns the difference between felly and telly

is that felly is the outer rim of a wheel, supported by the spokes while telly is television.

As an adverb felly

is fiercely, harshly.

felly

English

Etymology 1

(etyl) fely, from (etyl) felge, dative of felg, from (etyl) 'to creep, crawl').

Noun

(fellies)
  • The outer rim of a wheel, supported by the spokes.
  • * 1602 , , act 2 scene 2 lines 426-430:
  • all you Gods, / In generall Synod take away her power: / Breake all the Spokes and Fallies from her wheele [...].
  • * 1922 , :
  • The felly harshed against the curbstone: stopped.

    Alternative forms

    * felloe

    Etymology 2

    From .

    Adverb

    (en adverb)
  • Fiercely, harshly.
  • * 1590 , Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene , II.vi:
  • Ioues'' dreaded thunder light / Does scorch not halfe so sore, nor damned ghoste / In flaming ''Phlegeton does not so felly roste.
    ----

    telly

    English

    Noun

    (en-noun)
  • Television
  • Not much on telly tonight, as usual!
  • A television set
  • We've got a new, flat-screen telly .

    Derived terms

    * telly tennis

    Usage notes

    The plural is not used in the US.

    Synonyms

    * tube (US), TV, tele (UK, rare)