Scoff vs Tease - What's the difference?

scoff | tease |


As nouns the difference between scoff and tease

is that scoff is derision; ridicule; a derisive or mocking expression of scorn, contempt, or reproach or scoff can be (south africa) food while tease is one who teases.

As verbs the difference between scoff and tease

is that scoff is to jeer; laugh at with contempt and derision or scoff can be (british) to eat food quickly while tease is to separate the fibres of a fibrous material.

scoff

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) scof/skof, of Scandinavian origin. Compare (etyl) skaup, Danish skuffelse(noun)/skuffe(verb) and Old High German scoph.

Noun

(en noun)
  • Derision; ridicule; a derisive or mocking expression of scorn, contempt, or reproach.
  • * Shakespeare
  • With scoffs , and scorns, and contumelious taunts.
  • * 1852 , The Dublin University Magazine (page 66)
  • There were sneers, and scoffs , and inuendoes of some; prophecies of failure in a hundred ways
  • An object of scorn, mockery, or derision.
  • * Cowper
  • The scoff of withered age and beardless youth.
    Synonyms
    * derision, ridicule * See also

    Verb

  • To jeer; laugh at with contempt and derision.
  • * Goldsmith
  • Truth from his lips prevailed with double sway, / And fools who came to scoff , remained to pray.
    Synonyms
    * contemn, deride, sneer

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (South Africa) Food.
  • Verb

  • (British) To eat food quickly.
  • (South Africa) To eat.
  • Synonyms
    * (eat quickly) (l), (l) (US)

    See also

    * scuff

    tease

    English

    Verb

    (teas)
  • To separate the fibres of a fibrous material.
  • To comb (originally with teasels) so that the fibres all lie in one direction.
  • To back-comb.
  • To poke fun at.
  • To provoke or disturb; to annoy.
  • * (1800-1859)
  • *:Hesuffered them to tease him into acts directly opposed to his strongest inclinations.
  • *1684 , , (Hudibras)
  • *:Not by the force of carnal reason, / But indefatigable teasing .
  • *
  • *:"My tastes," he said, still smiling, "incline me to the garishly sunlit side of this planet." And, to tease her and arouse her to combat: "I prefer a farandole to a nocturne; I'd rather have a painting than an etching; Mr. Whistler bores me with his monochromatic mud; I don't like dull colours, dull sounds, dull intellects;."
  • To entice, to tempt.
  • Derived terms

    * tease out * teaser

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • One who teases.
  • A single act of teasing.
  • A cock tease; an exotic dancer; a stripper.
  • Synonyms

    * (cock tease) cockteaser, prickteaser

    Anagrams

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