Tease vs Banter - What's the difference?

tease | banter |


As verbs the difference between tease and banter

is that tease is to separate the fibres of a fibrous material while banter is to engage in banter or playful conversation.

As nouns the difference between tease and banter

is that tease is one who teases while banter is good-humoured, playful, typically spontaneous conversation.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

tease

English

Verb

(teas)
  • To separate the fibres of a fibrous material.
  • To comb (originally with teasels) so that the fibres all lie in one direction.
  • To back-comb.
  • To poke fun at.
  • To provoke or disturb; to annoy.
  • * (1800-1859)
  • *:Hesuffered them to tease him into acts directly opposed to his strongest inclinations.
  • *1684 , , (Hudibras)
  • *:Not by the force of carnal reason, / But indefatigable teasing .
  • *
  • *:"My tastes," he said, still smiling, "incline me to the garishly sunlit side of this planet." And, to tease her and arouse her to combat: "I prefer a farandole to a nocturne; I'd rather have a painting than an etching; Mr. Whistler bores me with his monochromatic mud; I don't like dull colours, dull sounds, dull intellects;."
  • To entice, to tempt.
  • Derived terms

    * tease out * teaser

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • One who teases.
  • A single act of teasing.
  • A cock tease; an exotic dancer; a stripper.
  • Synonyms

    * (cock tease) cockteaser, prickteaser

    Anagrams

    *

    banter

    English

    Noun

    (-)
  • Good-humoured, playful, typically spontaneous conversation.
  • It seemed like I'd have to listen to her playful banter for hours.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To engage in banter or playful conversation.
  • To play or do something amusing.
  • To tease (someone) mildly.
  • * Washington Irving
  • Hag-ridden by my own fancy all night, and then bantered on my haggard looks the next day.
  • * Charlotte Brontë
  • Mr. Sweeting was bantered about his stature—he was a little man, a mere boy in height and breadth compared with the athletic Malone
  • To joke about; to ridicule (a trait, habit, etc.).
  • * Chatham
  • If they banter' your regularity, order, and love of study, ' banter in return their neglect of them.
  • To delude or trick; to play a prank upon.
  • * Daniel De Foe
  • We diverted ourselves with bantering several poor scholars with hopes of being at least his lordship's chaplain.
  • (transitive, US, Southern and Western, colloquial) To challenge to a match.
  • Synonyms

    * (tease) kid, wind up

    Derived terms

    * (l)

    References

    Anagrams

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