Reem vs Team - What's the difference?

reem | team |


As nouns the difference between reem and team

is that reem is reem while team is team.

reem

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) .

Noun

  • A large horned animal in ancient Hebrew literature, variously identified with the wild ox or aurochs (Bos primigenius ), the Arabian oryx, or a mythical creature (compare (unicorn)).
  • Etymology 2

    Compare

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (nautical) To open (the seams of a vessel's planking) for the purpose of calking them.
  • team

    English

    (wikipedia team)

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) teme, from (etyl) . More at (l), (l).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A set of draught animals, such as two horses in front of a carriage.
  • * Macaulay
  • It happened almost every day that coaches stuck fast, until a team of cattle could be procured from some neighbouring farm to tug them out of the slough.
  • * 1931 , William Faulkner, Sanctuary , Vintage 1993, p. 111:
  • The adjacent alleys were choked with tethered wagons, the teams reversed and nuzzling gnawed corn-ears over the tail-boards.
  • Any group of people involved in the same activity, especially sports or work.
  • We need more volunteers for the netball team .
    The IT manager leads a team of three software developers.
  • (obsolete) A group of animals moving together, especially young ducks.
  • * Holland
  • a team of ducklings about her
  • * Dryden
  • a long team of snowy swans on high
  • (UK, legal, obsolete) A royalty or privilege granted by royal charter to a lord of a manor, of having, keeping, and judging in his court, his bondmen, neifes, and villains, and their offspring, or suit, that is, goods and chattels, and appurtenances thereto.
  • * ALEXANDER M. BURRILL, LAW DICTIONARY & GLOSSARY, vol II, 1871 URL: http://www.archive.org/details/cu31924022836450
  • TEAM, Theam, Tem, Them. Sax. [from tyman, to propagate, to teem.] In old English law. Literally, an offspring, race or generation. A royalty or privilege granted by royal charter to a lord of a manor, of having, keeping and judging in his court, his bondmen, neifes and villeins, and their offspring or suit. They who had a jurisdiction of this kind, were said to have a court of Theme... constantly used in the old books in connection with toll, in the expression Toll & Team.
    Usage notes
    * When referring to the actions of a sports team, British English typically uses the third-person plural form rather than the third-person singular. However, this is not done in other contexts such as in business or politics. ** **: Manchester were unable to bring the strong team they originally intended, ** **: Leeds were champions again.
    Descendants
    * German: (l)

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To form a group, as for sports or work.
  • They teamed to complete the project.
  • To convey or haul with a team.
  • to team lumber
    (Thoreau)
    Derived terms
    * double-team

    Etymology 2

    Verb

    (head)