Tax vs Squeeze - What's the difference?

tax | squeeze |


As nouns the difference between tax and squeeze

is that tax is money paid to the government other than for transaction-specific goods and services while squeeze is a difficult position.

As verbs the difference between tax and squeeze

is that tax is to impose and collect a tax from (a person) while squeeze is to apply pressure to from two or more sides at once.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

tax

English

(wikipedia tax)

Noun

  • Money paid to the government other than for transaction-specific goods and services.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-05-17
  • , author=George Monbiot, authorlink=George Monbiot , title=Money just makes the rich suffer , volume=188, issue=23, page=19 , magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) citation , passage=In order to grant the rich these pleasures, the social contract is reconfigured. […]  Essential public services are cut so that the rich may pay less tax . The public realm is privatised, the regulations restraining the ultra-wealthy and the companies they control are abandoned, and Edwardian levels of inequality are almost fetishised.}}
  • A burdensome demand.
  • a heavy tax on time or health
  • A task exacted from one who is under control; a contribution or service, the rendering of which is imposed upon a subject.
  • (obsolete) charge; censure
  • (Clarendon)
  • (obsolete) A lesson to be learned.
  • (Johnson)

    Synonyms

    * (money paid to government) impost, tribute, contribution, duty, toll, rate, assessment. exaction, custom, demand, levy

    Antonyms

    * (money paid to government) subsidy

    Hyponyms

    (types of taxes) * church tax * corporation tax * duty * estate tax * excise * excise tax * gift tax * goods and services tax * gross receipts tax * head tax * income tax * inheritance tax * land tax * poll tax * property tax * personal property tax * real property tax * sales tax * sin tax * sumptuary tax * transfer tax * use tax * utilities tax * value added tax

    Coordinate terms

    (other government revenues) * fine * license fee * penalty * seignorage * user charge

    Derived terms

    * tax collector * tax haven * tax hike * taxman * tax free * tax rise * taxes due * taxpayer

    Verb

    (es)
  • To impose and collect a tax from (a person).
  • Some think to tax the wealthy is the fairest.
  • To impose and collect a tax on (something).
  • Some think to tax wealth is destructive of a private sector.
  • To make excessive demands on.
  • * Do not tax my patience.
  • * '>citation
  • Derived terms

    * taxable * taxation

    squeeze

    English

    Verb

    (squeez)
  • To apply pressure to from two or more sides at once
  • I squeezed the ball between my hands.
    Please don't squeeze the toothpaste tube in the middle.
  • * 1922 , (Virginia Woolf), (w, Jacob's Room) Chapter 1
  • "Over there—by the rock," Steele muttered, with his brush between his teeth, squeezing out raw sienna, and keeping his eyes fixed on Betty Flanders's back.
  • (ambitransitive) To fit into a tight place
  • I managed to squeeze the car into that parking space.
    Can you squeeze through that gap?
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2010 , date=December 29 , author=Sam Sheringham , title=Liverpool 0 - 1 Wolverhampton , work=BBC citation , page= , passage=It was an omen of things to come as in the 56th minute the visitors took the lead after a mix-up between Skrtel and Sotirios Kyrgiakos allowed Ebanks-Blake's through-ball to squeeze between them.}}
  • * 1908 ,
  • Could he not squeeze under the seat of a carriage? He had seen this method adopted by schoolboys, when the journey- money provided by thoughtful parents had been diverted to other and better ends.
  • To remove something with difficulty, or apparent difficulty
  • He squeezed some money out of his wallet.
  • To put in a difficult position by presenting two or more choices
  • I'm being squeezed between my job and my volunteer work.
  • * 2013 May 23, , " British Leader’s Liberal Turn Sets Off a Rebellion in His Party," New York Times (retrieved 29 May 2013):
  • At a time when Mr. Cameron is being squeezed from both sides — from the right by members of his own party and by the anti-immigrant, anti-Europe U.K. Independence Party, and from the left by his Liberal Democrat coalition partners — the move seemed uncharacteristically clunky.
  • (figurative) To oppress with hardships, burdens, or taxes; to harass.
  • * L'Estrange
  • In a civil war, people must expect to be crushed and squeezed toward the burden.
  • (baseball) To attempt to score a runner from third by bunting
  • Jones squeezed in Smith with a perfect bunt.

    Derived terms

    (terms derived from the verb "squeeze") * squeezable * squeezebox * squeeze in * squeeze out * squeezer * squeezy * unsqueeze

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A difficult position
  • I'm in a tight squeeze right now when it comes to my free time.
  • A traversal of a narrow passage
  • It was a tight squeeze , but I got through to the next section of the cave.
  • A hug or other affectionate grasp
  • a gentle squeeze on the arm
  • (slang) A romantic partner
  • I want to be your main squeeze
  • (baseball) The act of bunting in an attempt to score a runner from third
  • The game ended in exciting fashion with a failed squeeze .
  • (epigraphy) An impression of an inscription formed by pressing wet paper onto the surface and peeling off when dry.
  • The light not being good enough for photography, I took a squeeze of the stone.
  • (card games) A play that forces an opponent to discard a card that gives up one or more tricks.
  • (archaic) A bribe or fee paid to a middleman, especially in China.
  • See also

    * squash * squeegee * squish * margin squeeze